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Kilcloon Millennium Committee

Information

Kilcloon Millennium Committee

Parish

Location: Kilcloon, Co.Meath
Group Administrators: 2
Latest Activity: Nov 3, 2012

Batterstown Kilcloon & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter 20/01/2012

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

December 9th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

December 8th at 7.30 p.m.                           Thomas & Genevieve Hayde

December 9th at 11 a.m.                              Denis & Elizabeth Doyle

December 15th at 7.30 p.m.                          Martin & Violet Fitzgerald

December 22nd at 7.30 p.m.                         Thomas Carrigan

Little Chapel Masses

December 8th at 6.30 p.m.                           Frank Prendergast & Family & dec. members of the O’Gorman family

December 9th at 10.30 a.m.                          P.J.Murphy MM

December 15th at 6.30 p.m.                          Elizabeth & Michael Rogers

December 16th at 10.30 a.m.                        Patrick & Jane Burke

Batterstown Masses

December 9th at 9.30 a.m.                           Declan Smith

December 11th at 7.30 p.m.                          May Ann Smith

December 13th at 9.30 a.m.                          Clair McCarrick & members of the Wilson family

December 16th at 9.30 a.m.                          Harry & Sean Monaghan                                                           

Altar Society:                                           Team 15 – 15th to 22nd Dec.   -    M.Callanan, M.McCarthy & M.Ferris

 

 

Senior Citizens Christmas Dinner

The Senior Citizens Christmas dinner for the parish will be held in Caffrey’s on Wednesday, 12th December at 12.30 p.m. for one o’clock.   All Senior Citizens welcome.

Kilcock Senior Citizens Christmas Party

This year’s Senior Citizen’s Christmas Party will take place on Wednesday, 12th December in St. Coca’s Hall, Kilcock, and will commence with Mass at 7.30 p.m.

Collection for Wheelchair Ass. in Batterstown

Many thanks to the Parishoners of Batterstown for their kind donation of €167.90. (Philip)

Blackhall Gaels Camogie AGM

Blackhall Gaels Camogie AGM on the 9th of December at 7 p.m in Batterstown Meeting hall.

 

Kilcloon  Macra
Well done to the capers team who qualified for national semi-final and for winning awards for best female and best male performers.    Indoor soccer this Sunday afternoon in Summerhill Community Centre.     Emer 0879205076.

Initial response by the Irish Catholic Bishop’s Conf. on the Report of the Expert Group on the Judgement in A,B & C v Ireland

A society that believes the right to life is the most fundamental of all rights cannot ignore the fact that abortion is first and foremost a moral issue.  As a society we have a particular responsibility to ensure this right is upheld on behalf of those who are defenceless, voiceless or vulnerable. This includes our duty as a society to defend and promote the equal right to life of a pregnant mother and the innocent and defenceless child in her womb when the life of either of these persons is at risk.  By virtue of their common humanity the life of a mother and her unborn baby are both sacred. They have an equal right to life. The Catholic Church has never taught that the life of a child in the womb should be preferred to that of a mother. Where a seriously ill pregnant woman needs medical treatment which may put the life of her baby at risk, such treatments are morally permissible provided every effort has been made to save the life of both the mother and her baby.   Abortion, understood as the direct and intentional destruction of an unborn baby, is gravely immoral in all circumstances. This is different from medical treatments which do not directly and intentionally seek to end the life of the unborn baby.   Current law and medical guidelines in Ireland allow nurses and doctors in Irish hospitals to apply this vital distinction in practice. This has been an important factor in ensuring that Irish hospitals are among the safest and best in the world in terms of medical care for both a mother and her unborn baby during pregnancy. As a country this is something we should cherish, promote and protect.  The Report of the Expert Group on the Judgement in A, B and C v Ireland has put forward options that could end the practice of making this vital ethical distinction in Irish hospitals. Of the four options presented by the Report, three involve abortion – the direct and intentional killing of an unborn child. This can never be morally justified. The judgement of the European Court of Human Rights does not oblige the Irish Government to legislate for abortion.

 

2nd Sunday of Advent

Mark begins his gospel today with a very firm statement.   “This is the beginning of the good news about Jesus Christ, the Son of God”.   In one way he was right.   In another he can appear to have been wrong.   The preparation for the big event we are about to relive on December 25th began long before   John the Baptist.   It began when God chose a small Middle Eastern family settled in a place called Ur of the Chaldees (its ruins are being plundered at this very time in Iraq) led by a man called Abraham.   God chose him and his descendants to be the channel through which he would gradually feed to human beings the information which provided a context for the coming of Jesus, the Son of God.   God made a solemn agreement with Abraham.   He promised that Abraham and his descendants would be as numerous as the sands on the seashore or as the stars in the heavens and that one day when the time was right he would send his chosen one, his messenger, to lead men to the truth.   Like the rest of us, this extended family – in time a race - strayed.   They broke the covenant by turning their backs on the laws given by God to Moses and went on to worship false gods whose habits they picked up from their pagan neighbours.   God punished them for this.   They were scattered through the Middle East, slaughtered by neighbouring kings.   But God sent them prophets; giants like Isaiah and Jeremiah who called them back to observe God’s law and renewed God’s promise to send his messenger to save the people from their sins.   As is the way with prophesy, some of the visions were obscure, but some were as clear as the sound of a whistle.   Isaiah put it most clearly of all.  

“The spirit of the law has been given to me,

for the Lord has anointed me, he has sent me to bring good news to the poor,

to bind up hearts that are broken

to proclaim liberty to captives,

freedom to those in prison: to proclaim a year of favour to the Lord”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

And it was these remarks with which Jesus began his comments in the scriptures when he was first invited, as a native son who had acquired a reputation elsewhere, to comment on the scriptures in the synagogue of Nazareth.   He had read from the scroll containing the book of the prophet Isaiah and when he had read the words quoted above, he sat down and the eyes of all were upon him.   The locals who knew him, those who were his companions and those who were friends and neighbours of his parents, waited with baited breadth to hear what this mysterious and gifted native had to say.  They were not disappointed.   Jesus dropped a bombshell.   “This day”, he said, “This text is being fulfilled even as you listen.”   And they wondered at the gracious words that came from his lips, as well they might.  He was living witness to the way people like Isaiah had prepared the way for him by being transmitters of God’s wisdom and plans to his people chosen as the race from which God’s messenger would come.   The great Jeremiah prepared for the event with other ideas.   “Deep within them (the chosen or Jewish race) I will plant my law, writing it on their hearts.   Then I will be their God and they shall be my people.”   All these visions of the life of Him who was to come were well known to all the Jewish people.   Most of them couldn’t read or write, it is true, but as in Ireland long ago the oral tradition was strong and they knew their scriptures in detail.   The great prayer of Our Lady, the Magnificat, is almost entirely made up of quotations from the prophets of the race, fused into a coherent prayer by the Mother of God.  So Mark was not entirely right when he began his gospel by saying it was the beginning of the good news about Jesus Christ the Son of God.   John the Baptist was only the one who made the immediate preparation for the public mission of Christ.  For over a thousand years God had gradually prepared the Jewish people for the coming of his Son so that they could understand the truth he was to give them.  And then after Jesus was crucified St. Paul especially came slowly to realise that the good news of Jesus, Son of God, was meant, not just for the Jews alone but for all mankind, a restoration of the hope of eternity for us all after the disasters at the beginning of our race.

Blackhall Gaels AGM

The AGM will be held on Wednesday 12th December in Batterstown Clubhouse @ 8 p.m.   All members are asked to attend.

Mulhussey Parents’ Association

Are holding a “Bake Sale” on Sunday 16th December 2012 after the 11 a.m. Mass in Kilcloon.   Your support would be greatly appreciated.

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

November 18th  2012

Kilcloon Masses

November 17th at 7.30 p.m.                         Mass for last year’s deceased members of the parish & outside

                                                                Candles can be collected on the way in for the ceremony

November 18th at 11 a.m.                            Annie Walsh ■John Renehan ■ Joe Dunne & family

November 23rd at 9.45 a.m.                         Joe Giles & extended family

November 24th at 7.30 p.m.                         Grace Bracken ■Michael Carty, Waynestown

November 25th at 11 a.m.                            Barney Collins & Collins, Cassidy & Kilduff families

December 1st at 7.30 p.m.                            Tom Madden

December 2nd at 11 a.m.                             Paddy, Michael & Delia Dolan ■ Maura O’Neill  ■ June O’Sullivan

Little Chapel Masses

November 17th at 6.30 p.m.         Mai Field

November 19th at 10 a.m.            Deceased members of the Hyland family

November 24th at 6.30 p.m.         Christy O’Brien & deceased family members

November 25th at 10.30 a.m.       Bridget & Patrick Dixon

December 1st at 6.30 p.m.            John Byrne, and deceased members of the Byrne & Dixon families.

December 2nd at 10.30 a.m.         Pat Dixon

December 8th at 6.30 p.m.           Frank Prendergast & Family & deceased members of the O’Gorman family

December 15th at 6.30 p.m.          Elizabeth & Michael Rogers

December 16th at 10.30 a.m.        Patrick & Jane Burke

December 9th at 10.30 a.m.          P.J.Murphy MM

Batterstown Masses

November 18th at 9.30 p.m.         Sean, Francis & Harry Monaghan ■ Patsy & Nora Geoghegan

November 20th at 7.30 p.m.         Patrick & Christina Kelly

November 25th at 9.30 a.m.         Joseph Whitty ■Justin O’Brien & Mina Hagan

Altar Society:                                           Team 13 – 17th to 24th November   -    B. Lucas, & S. Dowd

 

 

Recent Death

RIP: John Gavin, late of Clonmellon, died recently and was buried in Clonmellon on Thursday.

Dunshaughlin Parish. Year of Faith

Dunshaughlin Parish. Year of Faith; Parish Renewal. Seminars on Tuesday nights 7.30 - 9.20 p.m. Tuesday 20th November; Growing in Christ. (Fr. Joe Brilly) Tuesday 27th November; Living in the Spirit. (Joe Dalton)     All are welcome in the parish Church, Dunshaughlin.

Senior Citizens Christmas Dinner

The Senior Citizens Christmas dinner for the parish will be held in Caffrey’s on Wednesday, 12th December at 12.30 p.m. for one o’clock.   All Senior Citizens welcome.

Kilcock Senior Citizens Christmas Party

This year’s Senior Citizen’s  Christmas Party will take place on Wednesday, 12th December in St. Coca’s Hall, Kilcock, and will commence with Mass at 7.30 p.m.

Summer Gaeltacht Courses

Summer Gaeltacht courses for secondary school students at Coláiste Sheosaimh in Cill Chiaráin and Carna, Conamara. Contact Alma 087 7376981 or visit www.colaistesheosaimh.com for more information.

Scoil Oilibhéir Naofa Fundraiser

Scoil Oilibhéir Naofa are holding a fundraising night in “Plantagen Garden Works” in Dunboyne from 7 to 9 p.m. on 22nd November.   Tickets are €5 each and are on sale in the school.

Annual Christmas Newsletter

Newsletter on sale from November 24th.   Cost €4.   Facts & accounts of parish activities with photos of Communion and Confirmation classes in each of the 3 schools.

Days of Disaster

In the gospel today there are three disasters referred to.   One of them is now over, the other two are yet to come.  

 

The disaster that is now over and was foreseen by Jesus himself was the destruction, not long after his death, that was to be visited on Jerusalem.   The Jews were a fractious race; the Romans found it difficult to control them.   You will remember that one of the reasons Pilate allowed the Jews to crucify our Lord even though he found no reason to condemn him to death, was that he was a fomenter of a revolt, in fact the Jews preferred a real threat to law and order, Barabbas, to Jesus when Pilate gave them a choice between the two of them.   “Not this man but Barabbas,” they said to Pilate, thus condemning Jesus to death.

 

The unrest of the race ripened into a full scale revolt against the Romans just before 70 AD only thirty years after the crucifixion.   The revolt lasted for a few years but the Roman emperor could not tolerate the independence declared and he sent in a gentleman, who succeeded him eventually as emperor, called Titus.   He destroyed Jerusalem, sowed it with salt to be sure it would not rise again and cause more trouble and become once again a focus for the Jewish race.   The salt meant that no crops could grow there.   Of course in time they rose again as did Jerusalem.   But Jesus described what happened in colourful language, “The sun will be darkened, the moon will not give her light, the stars will come falling from the heavens and the powers of heaven will be shaken.   Take a fig tree as a parable, when the twigs grow supple and its leaves come out, you know that summer is near.    I tell you solemnly before this generation has passed away, all these things will have taken place.”   The apostles must have remembered his words when it did happen, and the very centre of the Jewish world was destroyed; they handed down these words of Jesus and they eventually found their way to the gospel of St. Mark.   The other two disasters were and still are in the future as he was foretelling the end of the world on the day of general judgement.   Having described the days of distress that preceded it he went on, “Then they will see the Son of Man coming in clouds with great power and glory; he too will send his angels to gather his chosen from the four winds from the ends of the world to the ends of heaven.”   These words too must have so impressed the apostles that they were handed down as part of the vision of the news Jesus came on earth to impart, and they appear for our instruction in the gospel of St. Mark.

 

The third disaster he remarked on is more relevant to ourselves.   “Before this generation has passed away, these things will have taken place.   Heaven and earth will pass away but my words will not pass away.”   He was referring to the end that faces us all in death and the way a judgement on all our deeds during our lives is facing us as well.   “But”, he says, “That day or hour nobody knows and neither the angels of heaven nor the son, no one but the father”.   A condition of our death is its unexpectedness.   In the death notices in the paper so often we read, and so and so died unexpectedly, but the truth is that’s the way we all die.

 

We must untangle from the gospel today the three disasters foretold by Jesus.   There was the fall of Jerusalem and the end of the Jewish way of life from which Our Lord emerged.   There is the vision of the end of the world as we know it and there is the end of our own poor world which will come unexpectedly when we least expect it.

Kilcloon Macra

Capers practice each Monday and Friday evening at 8 p.m. in Batterstown Hall.    Mystery trip Saturday 17th.   For information contact Emer 087 9205076.

Bicycle Found

A bicycle has been found in the grounds of The Little Chapel.   Call 01 6287263.

 

 

 

 

November 11th  2012

Kilcloon Masses

November 9th at 8.45 a.m.                           Patrick Lohan

November 10th at 7.30 p.m.                         Deceased members of the Sheerin & Jennings Families  

November 11th at 11 a.m.                            Paddy Sheerin & daughter Patricia

November 23rd at 9.45 a.m.                         Joe Giles & extended Family

November 24th at 7.30 p.m.                         Grace Bracken ■Michael Carty, Waynestown

November 25th at 11 a.m.                            Barney Collins & Collins, Cassidy & Kilduff Families

December 1st at 7.30 p.m.                            Tom Madden

December 2nd at 11 a.m.                             Paddy, Michael & Delia Dolan ■ Maura O’Neill  ■ June O’Sullivan

Little Chapel Masses

November 11th at 10.30 a.m.       Michael & Albert Phoenix, Phoepotstown

November 12th at 10 a.m.            Pat & Josephine Craig

November 17th at 6.30 p.m.         Mai Field

November 19th at 10 a.m.            Deceased members of the Hyland Family

November 25th at 10.30 a.m.       Bridget & Patrick Dixon

December 1st at 6.30 p.m.            John Byrne, and deceased members of the Byrne & Dixon Families.

December 2nd at 10.30 a.m.         Pat Dixon

December 8th at 6.30 p.m.           Frank Prendergast & Family & deceased members of the O’Gorman Family

December 9th at 10.30 a.m.          P.J.Murphy MM

Batterstown Masses

November 11th at 9.30 a.m.         Olive Keaveney MM   ■ John Lovely 

November 13th at 7.30 p.m.         Niall & Patrick Bracken

November 18th at 9.30 p.m.         Sean, Francis & Harry Monaghan ■ Patsy & Nora Geoghegan

Altar Society:                                           Team 13 – 17th to 24th November   -    B. Lucas, & S. Dowd

Recent Death

R.I.P P.J.Murphy late of Bridestream who was buried in St. Josephs Cemetery on Tuesday, November 6th.

Mass of Remembrance

Mass of remembrance for all parishioners on Saturday November 17th at 7.30 p.m. There are sheets in each church to include other members of families or relatives who died in the past year.   Candles will be presented to light for each person at the mass.

 

 

Dunshaughlin Parish. Year of Faith

Dunshaughlin Parish. Year of Faith; Parish Renewal. Seminars on Tuesday nights 7.30 - 9.20 p.m. Tuesday 13th November - Baptism in the Spirit. (Fr. Damian Ryan) Tuesday 20th November; Growing in Christ. (Fr. Joe Brilly) Tuesday 27th November; Living in the Spirit. (Joe Dalton)     All are welcome in the parish Church, Dunshaughlin.

Scoil Oilibhéir Naofa Fundraiser

Scoil Oilibhéir Naofa are holding a fundraising night in “Plantagen Garden Works” in Dunboyne from 7 to 9 p.m. on 22nd November.   Tickets are €5 each and will be on sale in the school.

GAA Lotto

4-9-19-22, No winner.   New jackpot is €5,600.   Next draw in Hatchet in on 17th November.

Rathregan National School, Boys Football Team

Best wishes to the Boys gaelic football team from Rathregan National School who will be competing in the final of the Meath schools competition next Saturday 17th November in Pairc Tailteann, Navan (time to be confirmed). All support would be greatly appreciated.

Batterstown Evening Mass

During the winter months the evening Mass on Tuesdays in Batterstown will take place

at 7.30 p.m.

The Widow’s Mite

I was doing a wedding in the University Church, Stephen’s Green of an American cousin of mine to a Lutheran who was from Germany but was working in London.   There was a young couple with a fairly recently born baby in a baby pram.  I asked them as is my wont; it comes from curiosity, what the child was called.   “Kilian” they told me.   “You must be from Wurzburg in Germany I said”.   “Yes, we are and Kilian is the popular boys’ name there”.   In fact they told me they were using the wedding as an opportunity of going north to Mullagh in County Cavan where Kilian is reputed to have come from.   He was martyred about the year 689.   His memory obviously was fresh and still alive in the city he had converted to the faith so long ago.   It put me in mind of the preface in the Mass for those who had been sanctified by the prayers of the people and were not bishops but ordinary priests.   It reads, “To renew the church in every age God raises up men and women, outstanding in holiness, to be the living witnesses of his unchanging love.   They inspire us by their heroic lives and help us by their constant prayers to be the living sign of God’s saving power.”   Kilian’s virtue, the virtue of which was handed down to the present day 1400 years after his death, was a powerful example to draw the young German couple with their recently born child, called Kilian after him, to Mullagh -  not the most prominent village on the tourist trail in Cavan.   I think some time ago the bishop of Wurzburg presented, in thanksgiving for the faith of his people, a statue to the citizens of Mullagh where it still is.

Kilian was one of the saints whose memory we saluted on Friday last.   It was the feast of all the saints of Ireland set up by the last Benedict to be a pope, Benedict XV.   He was the pope who beatified Oliver Plunkett and gave this feast day to Ireland.   What, you may ask, has this to do with the widow’s mite commemorated in the gospel today?   It has a lot to do with it.   Mark sets the scene very well for the incident, Jesus with his disciples were obviously sitting down in their own fashion commenting on the various people who were discharging their obligation as pilgrims by putting offerings ostentatiously into a great container set before the temple for that purpose.   Nowadays there would have been a photographer present to catch the moment and the pilgrim could bring a copy home as a souvenir.   I’m sure the authorities had some other means of marking the event even then.   The apostles were obviously impressed until their attention was drawn by Jesus to a shy lady who was putting in her modest offering of two mites.   She was, said Jesus, putting in the offering box more than any of the rich people around her.   She was putting into the box all that she had.   The incident was reported and remembered so that it was handed down to form part of Mark’s gospel and part of the good news the apostles were spreading.   The important thing was not the amount of money that the widow put into the temple box or even the amount of help she was offering for the support of the temple.   The point was what was behind the giving, the motivation for it and the totality of the commitment that counted.   That brings us back to the Thursday’s feast day of all the saints of Ireland.   The vast majority of these saints are forgotten.   They are as if they never were, but they are with God and their lives, like that of Kilian of Wurzburg and Mullagh, were part of a tradition of faith that has been handed down to us to the present day.   We have a lot to live up to.   We may be discouraged by all the accounts of the failures of those who profess to be leaders in our tradition.   But it really doesn’t matter.   Do not prove unworthy of your ancestors, said one of the popes a long time ago in a letter to the Irish, do not lose the way of righteousness; but hold on to the teaching of those whose virtues you esteem, lest your pride in having them for your ancestors, those whom you are reluctant to imitate prove to be an empty boast.  It was the widow’s generosity and motivation that Jesus drew the attention of the apostles to.   She put into the temple box

all she had.

Blackhall Gaels GAA Club Fundraiser
 "Cash in the Attic" Auction and Liquidation Stock Sale to be held on Sunday 11th November in Batterstown Clubhouse.     Viewing/sale from 10 30 a.m.    Auction @ 1 p.m.  Please donate saleable items such as household items, bric-a-brac, furniture etc.    No TV’s, mattresses or broken electrical goods.  All proceeds will be used to maintain and to continue the development of the club and its facilities.   Information Maria on 0874157454'

Kilcloon Macra

Capers practice each Monday and Friday evening at 8 p.m. in Batterstown Hall.    Mystery trip next Saturday 17th.   For information contact Emer 087 9205076.

Bicycle Found

A bicycle has been found in the grounds of The Little Chapel.   Call 01 6287263.

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

First Friday

Next F

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

September 9th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

September 8th at 7.30 p.m.                           Jimmy & Esther Burke would like to thank all those who sympathised with them in their recent bereavement and the

7.30 p.m. Mass will be offered for their intentions.

September 9th at 11 a.m.                             The Regan & Fleming Families, especially Kista & Eilish

September 15th at 7.30 p.m.                         John Gerard & John Jennings

September 16th at 11 a.m.                            Sarah O’Connor  ■ Mícheal & Michael Fitzhenry

September 22nd at 7.30 p.m.                        Philomena Ganley & Nora Byrne  ■ Lily Sheeran

September 23rd at 11 a.m.                            Linnane, Tolan & Fitzpatrick Families & Eileen Kennedy

Little Chapel Masses

September 8th at 6.30 p.m.                           Olive O’Keeffe, at the request of the Balfeighan Cemetery Committee

September 9th at 10.30 a.m.                         Paddy & Joan Magee & Paddy & Terry Melia

September 15th at 6.30 p.m.                         Walter Haefner, at the request of the Little Chapel Community

September 16th at 10.30 a.m.                       Billy Glynn

September 22nd at 6.30 p.m.                        James & Helen Walsh

September 23rd at 10.30 a.m.                       Claire White

Batterstown Masses

September 9th at 9.30 a.m.                           Michael, Mary & Mary Ellen Keaveney

Stephen & Catherine Connaughton

September 16th at 9.30 a.m.                         Martin & Maureen Conway

Altar Society:                                           Team 8    8th to 15th Sept. S.Crampton,  T.Carty,  T.Carty &  P.Carty

 

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Coffee Morning

You are invited to a coffee morning 9:00 am - 9:00 pm, in aid of St. Francis Hospice, on Wednesday 26th. September at Mary Halligans, Bush Lane

Viatores Christi.
This weekend there will be a visitor from the Viatores Christi movement speaking at all the Masses.   We will hear about their mission and ministry.   They will be asking for some support for their work through donations on the day.   Support appreciated.

Masses in the Parish

As the priests are travelling with the Diocesan pilgrimage to Lourdes, there will be NO weekday Mass in any of the churches on Wed 12th; Thurs 13th or Fri 14th next week or on Mon 17th.

Weekend Mass Schedule will be as normal. Thank you

Little Chapel Mass for Walter Haefner

On Saturday 15th September at 6.30 p.m. Mass will be celebrated in the Little Chapel for the repose of the soul of Walter Haefner in recognition of his kindness and generosity towards the community of the Little Chapel

Blackhall Gaels Lotto

3-4-5-27, No winner.   New jackpot is €4,600.   Next draw in the Hatchet Inn on 08/09/12.

 

All Ireland Junior Camogie Final

BHG camogie club would like to wish Emily Mangan, Christina Troy, Holly Geraghty and Jane Dolan the very best of luck in the All-Ireland Junior Camogie Final -V- Down on the 16th of September in Croke Park at 12.00.    We would encourage that support is shown to the girls by attending the game on the 16th and flying the Meath flag.    It is a great occasion to have four of our club members playing on the team.   Contact Kate for information on purchasing tickets- 0877689028.

 

The Equality of Man

Both in words and action Jesus emphasised the central truth he stood for and came into the world to convey to us.   The world itself seems to value superiority, superiority of races, one above the other, the superiority of people, one above the other.   St. James in the second reading today warns us not to make distinctions between classes of people.   He tells us that this is the way people should act.   If a man comes into a synagogue, St. James writes, beautifully dressed and with a gold ring on his finger and at the same time a poor man comes in in shabby clothes, we all seem to judge the one superior to the other.   As St. James put it, you have now two standards in your mind and turn yourselves into judges and corrupt judges at that.   Listen my dear brothers; it was those who are poor according to the world that God chose to be rich in faith and to be heirs of the kingdom which he promised to those who love him.   Jesus himself made the very same point when he went up a hill in Judea and the people followed him and he delivered them what has been known ever since as the Sermon on the Mount, which is indeed a revolutionary doctrine.   It contradicts the accepted values of the time, in fact the accepted values of our society.   It turns them upside down, “Happy the gentle, they shall have the earth for their inheritance.   How happy the pure in spirit, theirs is the kingdom of heaven”.   The strange thing is that again and again Jesus in his preaching emphasises these points.   Even in the choosing of his disciples he chose people of no consequence who made a modest living by fishing and lived in an undervalued part of Judea.   As presented to us the apostles themselves were a sorry bunch.   Why did he pick them?   Two of them betrayed him.   They were in fact proof positive that God can make anyone an instrument of his grace and they went on after the Ascension to the four corners of the world telling people successfully of the good news that they had been, not only saved but had become adopted sons of God.   For the first time in human history men were given hope, not only of life eternal but also that they were the equal of any other man.   Jesus made the same point again and again in his preaching and in his relationship with people.   The miracles of which the incident in the gospel today was one worked on ordinary people like the deaf and dumb in today’s gospel, the woman with the issue of blood, Peter’s mother in law cured of the fever and those possessed of devils.   In the process he even did the unthinkable, he cured people on the Sabbath Day; this emphasised his priorities.   To the people scandalised by his forgiving of sins for a man brought into his presence by letting him down through the roof, he asked, “Which is easier to say, your sins are forgiven or to say get up and walk.”   He reacted with compassion to the sufferings of ordinary people.   He called the only son of the widow of Nain back to life and gave him to his mother.   He raised Lazarus his friend to life as well, an ordinary person in a modest house.   All these are examples of the way Jesus values the uniqueness of ordinary people and their value in the eyes of God.   We are so used to hearing the preaching of Jesus that we forget its significance and the way it refers to each one of us.   The vision he came to share with us is still shaping the lives of those believers like ourselves who are successors of the apostles.   At our reception of sacraments like baptism and Confirmation we are, if we wish to accept with faith the responsibilities that these sacraments involve and become like the apostles themselves, reflectors of the presence of God in the world.   That is what inspired thousands of our people to spend our lives in the service of people of a different race in a different corner of the earth.   That is what makes so terrible the betrayal of that responsibility by the abuse scandal that has so shocked our people that is what makes it heart-breaking to think about the young lives which were scarred for a lifetime by abuse suffered at the hands of those vowed to protect them.   It was a complete contradiction of the calling each of the abusers got and received in the life that they freely chose to live.   But the vision that has put and is putting its mark on people in different parts of the world is still being realised.   The Catholic Church is the leading organisation in providing of AIDS service in Africa.   Wherever missionaries went to in the world from China to Latin America to Africa, schools opened up with hospitals and clinics all in answer to the calling given by Jesus himself to the apostles when he left our earth to spread the good news he had brought with him to the world.   “Teach all nations.   Go out into the whole world; proclaim the good news to all creation; he who believes and is baptised will be saved and he who does not believe will be condemned.”   These words apply as much to us as to the apostles.   We are all in the business of preaching the good news by example, a lot more than with words.   We have different ways of spreading it.   In the family is the chief way of so doing; we do it by example in the workplace and perhaps it will bring us, like the apostles, to areas of the world that haven’t really heard the good news yet.   But the ways of spreading it are infinite and various.   It’s our business to find out the way we ourselves are called to spread it in answer to the command of Jesus.

Adult Classes

Adult classes will begin in the Boyne Community School in Trim on Thursday, September 16th when enrolment begins.   The classes begin on Monday 24th September.   The details of the classes are contained on the notice board at the back of Kilcloon Church and the telephone numbers are there if you wish to enrol.

 

riday is the First Friday of the month.   The housebound will be attended as usual.   Masses in Kilcloon at 8.45 a.m. Little Chapel at 10 a.m. and Batterstown at 8 p.m.

August 26th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

August 25th at 7.30 p.m.                           Philip Sheeran

August 26th at 11 a.m.                              Jarlath Carty ■Patrick & Ann Hallahan

September 1st at 7.30 p.m.                       Jack O’Malley

September 2nd at 11 a.m.                         Patrick Hallahan

September 9th at 11 a.m.                          The Regan & Fleming Families

Little Chapel Masses

August 25th at 6.30 p.m.                           Josephine Ryan

August 26th at 10.30 a.m.                         Mary (Mamie) Monaghan (sister of Bridie Joyce)

September 1st at 6.30 p.m.                       Cora Coyne

September 2nd at 10.30 a.m.                    Dennis Corcoran

September 8th at 6.30 p.m.                       Olive O’Keeffe, at the request of the Balfeighan Cemetery Committee

September 9th at 10.30 a.m.                     Paddy & Joan Magee & Paddy & Terry Melia

September 15th at 6.30 p.m.                     Walter Haefner, at the request of the Little Chapel Community

September 16th at 10.30 a.m.                   Billy Glynn

September 23rd at 10.30 a.m.                   Claire White

Batterstown Masses

August 26th at 9.30 a.m.                           Christina Plunkett

Altar Society:                                           Team 7 – 25th Aug to 1st September:   E.Burke, M.Clarke & M.Murphy

Recent Death

RIP Gerald Flynn, late of Kilgraigue (brother of Mossie Flynn)

 

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Lough Derg

Retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

X-PERT Programme for Type 2 Diabetes.
The 6 Week X-PERT programme outlines how to manage Type 2 Diabetes giving guidelines on how to manage weight, supermarket shopping, possible complications of diabetes and how to prevent them and the importance of lifestyle, diet and exercise. The course is FREE and is suitable for anyone with Type 2 Diabetes.   The next course will be running in Kilcock GAA from 12th September to 17th October 2012.   (Every Wednesday morning for 6 weeks: 10 a.m – 12.30 p.m)

Back to School Expenses

Spread the cost of those Back to School expenses.    Call into the Kilcloon Credit Union office to ask about a low-cost loan to give you a helping hand.   Talk to them first, they'll be happy to see you. Avoid the moneylenders at all costs. Contact them on 01 628 7824.

Kilcloon Macra

Congratulations to Kate Murphy who won the prize for Meath PRO of the year at the recent Awards Night. The club will host another "Tea after Mass" morning following 9.30 a.m mass in Batterstown this Sunday - weather permitting! For information contact Emer 086 4093452

St. Brigid’s Well

Blessing on Sunday, September 2nd at 3 p.m.   Note change of date from calendar of events.

St. Vincent de Paul – Back to School Expenses

Please call the St Vincent de Paul Society for assistance at 083 3992108

Blackhall Gaels Lotto

18-19-21-23, No winner.   New jackpot is €4,400.   Next draw in the Hatchet Inn on 25/08/12.

Text Alert Public Meeting

Little Chapel on Wednesday 29th August at 8 p.m.   People from Little Chapel area invited to attend.

 

Death and Suffering

 

The two greatest crosses we all have to endure are death and suffering and both are part of human life.

Death is so much a part of life that we don’t revolt against it.   It’s something our race had to endure from the very beginning.   It’s one of the greatest mysteries of our existence that our people have tried to solve in various ways throughout the centuries.   Our own county is dotted with graves to honour our dead and give us some focus for our mourning and for our prayers for their eternal wellbeing.   We hope they live beyond the grave.   Newgrange, which we know so well, is one of the greatest prayers in stone that has reflected the hope and confidence of our ancestors through the tunnel of light that lights up its interior on the shortest day of the year.   There are many other less spectacular prayers in stone testifying to the faith of those who built them with so much energy and art.   They knew that the artistic decorations of tombs help us to become more aware of the mysteries that surround us.   The tombs help us to raise our minds to the great God that made all things.   But we needed more assurance than that.   We know that the mysteries of death will be solved in the arms of the loving God.   So we have the words of consolation of the incarnate God who came among us to reassure us that our sins against man and against God would be forgiven and that we would be called as God’s sons to a relationship with him that was one of fulfilment and of love.   But there is always some doubt in our minds about that, just like some of the disciples and the congregation in the gospel today.   Jesus solved the problem not only of remaining with us after his death but of allowing us to be transformed into an image of himself.   Who could have imagined the method he used to bring that about?   Neither the Jews nor the disciples accepted what he told them.   “I am the bread of life” he said, “who has come down from heaven, your fathers ate manna in the desert, and they are dead, but whoever eats this bread will live forever and the bread is my flesh for the life of the world”.   Using the infinite power of God he used bread and wine, the stable food of the body in Palestine to be transformed into the very body and blood of God.   The Jews walked away saying that it was intolerable language and who could believe it?   It was not unreasonable reaction to his preaching about the Eucharist.   Yet he didn’t rush to explain what he meant any further.   “The words I have spoken to you are spirit and they are life”, he said.    It was at this stage that many of his disciples left him and stopped going with him.   His response was one in keeping with his way of not interfering with their freedom “Will you also go away?”, he asked them.   Peter had the only answer of faith, “Lord, to whom shall we go, you have the words of eternal life.”   In other words, we don’t understand what you are saying, but it is because it is you who say that we accept it even if we cannot understand it.   This comment is one of profound faith “You have the words of eternal life”.   Very often when disaster strikes us through death or suffering we too feel like the disciples and the Jews and our faith comes under attack and we are inclined to say “These experiences are intolerable and who can accept them?”   But if we have faith we put our trust in God.   Besides death the other great mystery is suffering.   Why should this happen to me?   We don’t have the answer to that question.   The only thing we can be sure of is that we do live in a valley of tears and that all we endure makes sense in the mind of God who judges these things in an eternal context.   The two mysteries then that dominate our lives are death and suffering.   The only answer we have to them is that of St. Peter who when he was asked was he going away also.   “Lord to whom shall we go, you have the words of eternal life.”   In other words the answer to these great mysteries is an absolute trust in God and of his love for us.

 

Back to school Coffee Morning

To welcome all of our parents back to school there will be a coffee morning in the School prefab on Thursday morning (30/09/12). Please call in and join us for a coffee to catch up after the Summer months. Any funds raised on the day will be divided between the School & Our Lady's Hospital for Sick Children in Crumlin.

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

August 19th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

August 18th at 7.30 p.m.                           Oliver Barry

August 19th at 11 a.m.                              Ellen Burke, Anniversary Mass

August 25th at 7.30 p.m.                           Philip Sheeran

August 26th at 11 a.m.                              Jarlath Carty ■Patrick & Ann Hallahan

September 1st at 7.30 p.m.                       Jack O’Malley

September 2nd at 11 a.m.                         Patrick Hallahan

September 9th at 11 a.m.                          The Regan & Fleming Families

Little Chapel Masses

August 18th at 6.30 p.m.                           Sean Cahalin, Parents, Brothers  & Sisters

August 19th at 10.30 a.m.                         James, Benny & Conn O’Reilly

August 25th at 6.30 p.m.                           Josephine Ryan

August 26th at 10.30 a.m.                         Mary (Mamie) Monaghan (sister of Bridie Joyce)

September 1st at 6.30 p.m.                       Cora Coyne

September 2nd at 10.30 a.m.                    Dennis Corcoran

September 8th at 6.30 p.m.                       Olive O’Keeffe, at the request of the Balfeighan Cemetery Committee

Batterstown Masses

August 19th at 9.30 a.m.                              Bartley & Brid Lynch

August 21st at 8 p.m.                                   John, Kathleen & Paddy Hughes

August 26th at 9.30 a.m.                              Christina Plunkett

Altar Society:                                           Team 7 – 25th Aug to 1st September:   E.Burke, M.Clarke & M.Murphy

 

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Lough Derg

Retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

X-PERT Programme for Type 2 Diabetes.
The 6 Week X-PERT programme outlines how to manage Type 2 Diabetes giving guidelines on how to manage weight, supermarket shopping, possible complications of diabetes and how to prevent them and the importance of lifestyle, diet and exercise. The course is FREE and is suitable for anyone with Type 2 Diabetes.   The next course will be running in Kilcock GAA from 12th September to 17th October 2012.   (Every Wednesday morning for 6 weeks: 10 a.m – 12.30 p.m)

Back to School Expenses

Spread the cost of those Back to School expenses.    Call into the Kilcloon Credit Union office to ask about a low-cost loan to give you a helping hand.   Talk to them first, they'll be happy to see you. Avoid the moneylenders at all costs. Contact them on 01 628 7824.

Prayer for Victims of Accident and Catastrophe

“God of Life, many people are suddenly and violently overtaken by death.   Their last moments are often filled with paralysing anguish and unspeakable suffering.   To you we raise up our prayers for those who perish in war, for all victims of violence and for those who die in accidents and the disasters of nature: stand by them and lead them into the Land of Light and Peace.   Fill up with your love all that is lacking to them, so that they can see You face to face.   For You are a God of the living and not of the dead”.

St. Brigid’s Well

Blessing on Sunday, September 2nd at 3 p.m.   Note change of date from calendar of events.

 

 

The Mysteries of our Faith

 

The great mysteries of our faith are rooted in natural things we can perceive, and in fact live with.   God chose natural things, natural gestures to communicate with his people.

 

When Jesus wished to show his love for all men he came to live among them.   He chose companions who during his public life of three years lived with him.   They were not men of extraordinary virtue, one of them betrayed him, they were not men of extraordinary ability, and the man of great ability was St. Paul who came later.   But not only did they get to know him but they became like him.   They were like in the front line of those who were exposed to the implications of the fact that God became man.   It was a very slow process.   They were first impressed by his deeds, by his words and gradually, like the members of any human family they became like him.   At first they did not understand what he was talking about, no more than did the people who queued up to hear him, though they did understand that there was something special about him.   They may not have understood the full implication of his sermons and teaching but they sensed that something greater than they had ever experienced before was there.   Thomas, doubting Thomas, was the first to put this quality into words.   “My Lord and my God”, he said when he first realised that Jesus had risen from the dead and he was not just God’s messenger or messiah but God himself.   It took however a few centuries before it was clear to all that Jesus was in fact God.   Again the feeding of the five thousand with barley loaves and fish established a link between ordinary food and the bread of life.   Bread and wine was part of the staple diet of those who lived in Palestine.   Both nourished the body and sustained life.   Now Jesus wished to leave his presence in the world for the benefit of all mankind; he chose bread and wine as the vehicle, the bread of heaven, that becoming his body and blood would nourish spiritually all who consumed it and be a pledge indeed to anyone who eats this bread that he would live forever.

 

Again the sacrament of baptism has to do with a washing that reflects the freedom from original sin that the sacrament among its many effects brings about.   If you have been at a baptism recently you will notice that the child to be baptised is anointed with oil on the breast.   It again is a custom going back to the Old Testament when the king was set aside for the service of his people.   Incidentally the same gesture has survived in the coronation ceremony in England where the sovereign is anointed for service of the people.   At Confirmation too the bishop anoints each candidate, calling down the Holy Spirit to set the candidate, now reaching maturity, apart, to be a part of God’s presence in the world.   The oil is consecrated in Mullingar at Holy Thursday.   It is used as well at the ordination of priests.   The same idea is present of setting the candidate aside for exclusive service to the community to which he is assigned.   The ceremony goes back to the beginning of our church.

 

Again St. James in his epistles instructs us “If one of you is ill he should send for the elders of the church and they must anoint him with oil in the name of the Lord and pray over him.   The prayer of faith will save the sick man and the Lord will raise him up again, and if he has committed any sins, they will be forgiven.   Even in a minor fashion the tradition of our church has encouraged what we call sacramentals the use of ordinary things for purposes of prayer.   Holy water for example, blessing ourselves going past a church or cemetery, the saying of the rosary for example reminds us of the whole gambit of the mysteries of faith and immerses us in the whole complicated relationship between God and ourselves.   All these seemingly trivial things are gestures to make us aware of the mysteries of eternity.   Without them we can forget the eternal dimension of all things, the brevity of human life and the inevitable process that we all face towards judgement and eternity.

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

August 15th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

August 15th at 11 a.m.                         Kathleen & Jack Fahy

August 18th at 7.30 p.m.                     Oliver Barry

August 19th at 11 a.m.                         Ellen Burke, Anniversary Mass

Little Chapel Masses

August 18th at 6.30 p.m.                     Sean Cahalin, Parents, Brothers  & Sisters

August 19th at 10.30 a.m.                   James, Benny & Conn O’Reilly

August 25th at 6.30 p.m.                     Josephine Ryan

August 26th at 10.30 a.m.                   Mary (Mamie) Monaghan (sister of Bridie Joyce)

Altar Society:                                           Team 6 – 11th to 18th Aug: M.Glynn,E.O’Reilly,G.O’Reilly & M.Mulligan

 

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Lough Derg

Retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

Little Chapel Mass for Walter Haefner

On Saturday 15th September at 6.30 p.m. Mass will be celebrated in the Little Chapel for the repose of the soul of Walter Haefner in recognition of his kindness and generosity towards the community of the Little Chapel

X-PERT Programme for Type 2 Diabetes.
The 6 Week X-PERT programme outlines how to manage Type 2 Diabetes giving guidelines on how to manage weight, supermarket shopping, possible complications of diabetes and how to prevent them and the importance of lifestyle, diet and exercise. The course is FREE and is suitable for anyone with Type 2 Diabetes.   The next course will be running in Kilcock GAA from 12th September to 17th October 2012.   (Every Wednesday morning for 6 weeks: 10 a.m – 12.30 p.m)

Back to School Expenses

Spread the cost of those Back to School expenses.    Call into the Kilcloon Credit Union office to ask about a low-cost loan to give you a helping hand.   Talk to them first, they'll be happy to see you. Avoid the moneylenders at all costs. Contact them on 01 628 7824.

Prayer for Victims of Accident and Catastrophe

“God of Life, many people are suddenly and violently overtaken by death.   Their last moments are often filled with paralysing anguish and unspeakable suffering.   To you we raise up our prayers for those who perish in war, for all victims of violence and for those who die in accidents and the disasters of nature: stand by them and lead them into the Land of Light and Peace.   Fill up with your love all that is lacking to them, so that they can see You face to face.   For You are a God of the living and not of

the dead”.

 

 

 

The Assumption

“Woman this is your Son”, then to the disciples he said, “John, this is your mother”.   And from that moment the disciple made a place for her in his home.   Jesus was entrusting his mother to St. John, a gesture of extraordinary trust.   The question arises, where did she go with St. John.   Jerusalem was obviously a dangerous place to be because of the crucifixion and the rumours of trouble that accompanied it.   It seems from the bible from the gospel of St. John that she disappeared without a trace.   Most reliable tradition brings her to the great Roman city of Ephesus which is in Turkey and had a population in those days of a quarter of a million people, a place where she could lose herself and feel safe.   So John brought her to Ephesus, the ruins of the city are still impressive.   It was a place of maritime trade, it was also the place that St. Paul gravitated to to preach and convert many of the population.   Unlike the rest of the apostles, John was not a martyr for tradition has it that he was imprisoned and he was tortured, but he wasn’t killed.   There is just outside the city of Ephesus today a stone house.   This contains an oratory in which Mass is often said; the tradition has it that this was the place that the Blessed Virgin lived with St. John, safe from the threats posed by the Jews and the Roman authority.   There is a holy well there and there is a wall full of flowers left by people who had petitions to make and people who had thanksgiving to express as well.   The house attracts Christians (Pope Paul VI visited it as did John Paul II) and Moslems for whom Our Lady is a figure of devotion.   Up to the present time there were traditions linking the house with Our Lady.   In a further century and a half ago a German mystic, Catherine Emmersmich, who bore the stigmata or the wounds of Christ on her body, had a vision that instructed her where the house of Our Lady could be found.   Included in that vision was an accurate description of Our Lady’s tomb from which she was assumed into heaven by her Son.   The vision was published in Germany but a French priest who was a teacher in the university in Smyrna which was a city very near Ephesus decided to use Catherine Emmersmich’s book to see if in fact there was a relationship between the description given in the book and the reality on the ground.

He found an amazing congruence between the description in the book and the reality on the ground.   He discovered too that there was a long tradition of local pilgrimage to the house and holy well and that the significance of the ruins was well known to Christians and Moslems alike and had been so for many centuries, as was the tomb from which the Assumption or Dormition as it was called, in the east, was reputed to have taken place.

 

That tradition was weak enough in the Latin west but remains strong and vibrant in the east when the feast day of the falling asleep, as the assumption was known there took place on the 15th August.   It was only in 1950 that the pope proclaimed the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin to heaven as a truth accepted by all Catholics, even though it had been accepted as such long since in tradition.  

 

In Ireland the 15th August from time in memorial was always the great feast of Our Lady in the year.   Hail full of grace was the angel’s salutation of Mary when he told her she was to be the mother of God and that phrase implies that she was free from all traces of sin so that she was immune to the old curse of death that had been the lot of human beings from the beginning.   The very Assumption into heaven is a pledge that we too can follow her to live with her Son in eternity and fulfilment and that’s the significance of the feast day of the Assumption today, the 15th August.

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter
Rev. Stan Deegan P.P. Tel: 01 8259267 Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252 www.kilcloon.com

August 12th 2012
Kilcloon Masses
August 11th at 7.30 p.m. Mary Mulligan ■ Peter Burke MMM
August 12th at 11 a.m. John Joe Fitzhenry
August 15th at 11 a.m. Kathleen & Jack Fahy
August 18th at 7.30 p.m. Oliver Barry
August 19th at 11 a.m. Ellen Burke, Anniversary Mass
Little Chapel Masses
August 11th at 6.30 p.m. Ronnie Rearden
August 12th at 10.30 a.m. Brian Reilly
August 18th at 6.30 p.m. Sean Cahalin, Parents, Brothers & Sisters
August 19th at 10.30 a.m. James, Benny & Conn O’Reilly
August 25th at 6.30 p.m. Josephine Ryan
August 26th at 10.30 a.m. Mary (Mamie) Monaghan (sister of Bridie Joyce)
Batterstown Masses
August 12th at 9.30 a.m. Peggy Lovely
August 14th at 8 p.m. Jim & Josie Faherty
Altar Society: Team 6 – 11th to 18th Aug: M.Glynn,E.O’Reilly,G.O’Reilly & M.Mulligan
Feast of the Assumption
The Feast of the Assumption is a Holy day of obligation and it falls on Wednesday, 15th August. Mass times in the parish are as follows: Little Chapel; 10 a.m.; Kilcloon; 11 a.m. & Batterstown at 8 p.m.
Pilgrimage to Lourdes
Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith. Fare €699 inclusive. Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300 Lough Derg
Retreat on Saturday, September 1st. No fasting or walking barefoot. Early booking essential. Contact: 01 8259596
Little Chapel Mass for Walter Haefner
On Saturday 15th September at 6.30 p.m. Mass will be celebrated in the Little Chapel for the repose of the soul of Walter Haefner in recognition of his kindness and generosity towards the community of the Little Chapel
X-PERT Programme for Type 2 Diabetes.
The 6 Week X-PERT programme outlines how to manage Type 2 Diabetes giving guidelines on how to manage weight, supermarket shopping, possible complications of diabetes and how to prevent them and the importance of lifestyle, diet and exercise. The course is FREE and is suitable for anyone with Type 2 Diabetes. The next course will be running in Kilcock GAA from 12th September to 17th October 2012. (Every Wednesday morning for 6 weeks: 10 a.m – 12.30 p.m)
Back to School Expenses
Spread the cost of those Back to School expenses. Call into the Kilcloon Credit Union office to ask about a low-cost loan to give you a helping hand. Talk to them first, they'll be happy to see you. Avoid the moneylenders at all costs. Contact them on 01 628 7824.
Prayer for Victims of Accident and Catastrophe
“God of Life, many people are suddenly and violently overtaken by death. Their last moments are often filled with paralysing anguish and unspeakable suffering. To you we raise up our prayers for those who perish in war, for all victims of violence and for those who die in accidents and the disasters of nature: stand by them and lead them into the Land of Light and Peace. Fill up with your love all that is lacking to them, so that they can see You face to face. For You are a God of the living and not of the dead”.

The Eucharist - Part 3
The gospel today is the third part of the discourse of St. John which one way or another has in the gospels of the last few Sundays told us something of the beliefs about the Eucharist handed down to the Jewish and Gentile believers. Obviously the Eucharist was at the centre of their liturgical life and it was defined as such by the words of Jesus that formed their tradition. The gospel read today is no different. It contains remarks made by Jesus that tell us in different ways the essence of our belief in the Eucharist.

Among the statements made was that unless God the Father draws us to himself then we cannot come to Jesus. If we do accept the Father then we shall be raised up on the last day. We will be taught by God and will hear the teaching of the Father and learn from it. That is to come to Jesus himself. No one, he added, has seen the Father. Jesus adds here, “I am the bread of life – your fathers indeed ate manna for their food on the long journey from Egypt to the Holy Land but they are long since dead, but he who eats the bread of life, the living bread come down from heaven; unlike the manna, he who eats this bread will live forever. This bread I shall give is my flesh for the life of the world”. The Jews were naturally perplexed and who could blame them? Then they said to one another, “Surely the man is not from heaven. We know his family”, Mary and perhaps Joseph, if he was still alive. But they got no satisfaction from Jesus. “Stop complaining”, he said, and he merely reiterated what he had said. “I tell you solemnly, everyone who believes has eternal life”. He went on, “I am the bread of life. This is the bread which came down from heaven so that a man can eat it and not die. I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Anyone who eats this bread will live forever and the bread that I shall give is my flesh for the life of the world”.

It sounds complicated but really in time the remarks became very clear. All these remarks found absolute clarity at the Last Supper when Jesus, using his powers as God took bread broke it and handed it to the disciples saying, “This is my body.” He told them of the relationship between the bread of life and the ordinary bread that nourishes the body. One nourishes the body and transformed by Jesus into his body and blood, nourishes the soul. The mystery was solved that perplexed both Jew and apostle. By his power he changed the bread and handed it out to them as the bread that came from heaven. They realised something of the mysterious descent of the Son of God into our earth to bring us life everlasting. We came to know that the words of transformation by the commands of Jesus now used at the communal meal meant that once again God became man to nourish spiritually the believers who accept him.

Of course the communal meal we share is called the Mass. We who offer the Mass are acknowledging once again the crucifixion of Christ and acknowledging the promise made by him that he would be with us to the very end of time. Of course believers who have received the body and the blood of Christ have an obligation to thank God for the extraordinary miracle that happens on our altars each time that Mass is said. When you do think of what happens on our altars and inside ourselves when we have received the body and blood of Christ you would wonder how it would be possible for us to abstain from going to Mass for a long period or for a lifetime. “I am the bread of life that came down from heaven”, he said, and anyone who eats this bread will live forever and the bread I give is my flesh for the life of the world. It’s an extraordinary privilege that we have been given that guarantees for us everlasting life.

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

Bank Holiday

There will be only one Mass in the parish on Monday next.   Mass will take place at 11 a.m. in the Parish Church.

August 5th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

August 5th at 11 a.m.                                Bill, Mary, John, Joe & Willie Giles

August 11th at 7.30 p.m.                           Mary Mulligan  ■   Peter Burke MMM

August 12th at 11 a.m.                              John Joe Fitzhenry

August 15th at 11 a.m.                              Kathleen & Jack Fahy

August 18th at 7.30 p.m.                           Oliver Barry

August 19th at 11 a.m.                              Ellen Burke, Anniversary Mass

Church Gate Collection – Multiple Sclerosis

A church gate collection for Multiple Sclerosis will take place after all Masses in the parish on 18th & 19th August.

Little Chapel Masses

August 4th at 6.30 p.m.                             James (Jim) Ryan

August 5th at 10.30 a.m.                           John Joe Kinnane

August 11th at 6.30 p.m.                           Ronnie Rearden

August 12th at 10.30 a.m.                         Brian Reilly

August 18th at 6.30 p.m.                           Sean Cahalin, Parents, Brothers & Sisters

August 19th at 10.30 a.m.                         James, Benny & Conn O’Reilly

August 25th at 6.30 p.m.                           Josephine Ryan

August 26th at 10.30 a.m.                         Mary (Mamie) Monaghan (sister of Bridie Joyce)

Batterstown Masses

August 5th at 9.30 a.m.                                Bernie Plunkett    ■   Jimmy Love

August 7th at 8 p.m.                                    Brigid Brady

August 9th at 9.30 a.m.                                David & Sean Kinghan

August 12th at 9.30 a.m.                              Peggy Lovely

Altar Society:                                           Team 6 – 11th to 18th Aug: M.Glynn,E.O’Reilly,G.O’Reilly & M.Mulligan

 

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Lough Derg

Retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

Kilcloon Macra

Best of luck to Niamh Fagan from Kilcloon Macra who will be representing Meath at the International Miss Macra Festival in Tipperary next weekend. For information contact 086 4093452.

Blackhall Gaels Lotto

5 – 9 – 17 - 25, no winner.

New jackpot is €4,200.   Next draw in Caffrey’s on 11th August 2012.

Little Chapel Mass for Walter Haefner

On Saturday 15th September at 6.30 p.m. Mass will be celebrated in the Little Chapel for the repose of the soul of Walter Haefner in recognition of his kindness and generosity towards the community of the Little Chapel

X-PERT Programme for Type 2 Diabetes.
The 6 Week X-PERT programme outlines how to manage Type 2 Diabetes giving guidelines on how to manage weight, supermarket shopping, possible complications of diabetes and how to prevent them and the importance of lifestyle, diet and exercise. The course is FREE and is suitable for anyone with Type 2 Diabetes.   The next course will be running in Kilcock GAA from 12th September to 17th October 2012.   (Every Wednesday morning for 6 weeks: 10 a.m – 12.30 p.m)

Back to School Expenses

Spread the cost of those Back to School expenses.    Call into the Kilcloon Credit Union office to ask about a low-cost loan to give you a helping hand.   Talk to them first, they'll be happy to see you. Avoid the moneylenders at all costs. Contact them on 01 628 7824.

Irish Cancer Society Fundraiser

Veronica O’Reilly would like to thank all those who helped in any way in the recent fundraising events in Maynooth for the Irish Cancer Society.   The sum of €2,014.21 was raised by the two events.

 

Preparations for the Eucharist

We are so accustomed to receiving the Eucharist at Mass on Sundays that we do take it for granted.   It is of course the greatest miracle of our faith.   It’s the way the coming of our God into our world becomes real for us, it’s carefully presented to us, not to take away our freedom or reject it but to make it possible for our own faith to accept it while our freedom is preserved.

Jesus himself had the same problem.   How could such an extraordinary mystery be made real to us while allowing us the freedom to reject it?In the gospel of a recent Sunday is the answer.   People came in great numbers to hear Jesus speak and witness the working of miracles.   St. John in his gospel gives us an example of what happened and how Jesus gradually fed the possibility of what the Eucharist was to the people so that they could digest the implications of what he intended.   In last Sunday’s gospel when the crowds came to him in a remote spot he staged a miracle.   How can so many get something to eat he asked; there were no shops near at hand but Andrew, Peter’s brother ,introduced a small boy with five barley loaves and some fish.   But Andrew said “What is that among so many”?   But Jesus broke the bread and fish and gave it to the crowd until they were all fed.   It was the first indication of the parallel between ordinary food that nourishes the body and the Eucharist which nourishes the soul.   Seeing the extraordinary power he exercised people accepted that he was the messiah.   Jesus was afraid they would make him king and he hid himself in the nearby mountains.   The people continued looking for him and when they found him they asked him how he had crossed the lake with his disciples.   Jesus told them that they were not looking for him because of his sermons or because of the signs that he worked, but rather because of the bread that they wanted to eat.   Don’t work for the bread that cannot last, he told them, but for the food that endures to eternal life, the bread on which the Father had set his seal.   What can we do if we are to do the work you want, they asked.   You must believe in the one the Father has sent, Jesus told them.   They were naturally sceptical.   Give us a sign they asked him, just like the sign given to Moses and to the Jewish race on their exodus from Egypt which was the bread called manna.   It was the Father who gave you that bread, not Moses, but your Father in heaven.   The true bread is that which has come down from heaven and gives life to the world.   They were overwhelmed, “Sire”, they said, “Give us that bread always”, Jesus answered, “I am the bread of life.   He who comes to me will never be hungry; he who believes in me will never thirst”.

Naturally the Jews objected.   “How can this man give us bread from heaven”?   We know his family.   We know his people.   “Stop complaining,” Jesus said, but he didn’t draw back.   “No one can come to me unless he is drawn by my Father who sent me and I will raise him up on the last day.   I am the bread of life” he told them.   “Your Fathers ate manna in the desert.   They are dead.    I am the living bread that has come down from heaven so that a man can eat it and not die – the bread I give is my flesh for the life of the world”.   He was gradually preparing them for the Eucharist itself.   “Anyone that does eat my flesh and drink my blood has eternal life and I shall raise him up on the last day.   This is the bread come down from heaven, not like the bread our ancestors ate; they are dead.   But anyone who eats this bread will live forever”.   He was preparing the apostles obviously for the key that unlocked the great mystery which happened at the Last Supper; there he took bread and broke it with solemn effect and said, “This is my body – this is my blood” and the event was tied up with the sacrifice he made for us on the cross on the days ahead.   The Last Supper had a profound effect on all the disciples.   If you remember when two disciples went to Emmaus soon after the crucifixion they invited him to join them at supper.   He took up a piece of bread and broke it. They recognised him at once at the breaking of bread.   Just fifty years after our Lord’s crucifixion St. Ignatius of Antioch, successor of St. Peter in Antioch left us a description of Christian worship.   At the centre of it is the Eucharist as we know it, “The Eucharist is not common bread or drink.   Instead the food consecrated by the word of prayer that comes from him is the flesh and blood of that incarnate Jesus”.

It was always so at the Sunday liturgy of Ignatius.   Is it always so in our liturgy or in our own prayers?   It is so easy to forget or to take for granted the extraordinary mystery first hinted at by Jesus when he multiplied the loaves and the fishes for the ordinary hungry people so long ago in Palestine on that hill.   For he is the bread of life

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

July 29th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

July 28th at 7.30 p.m.                               Martin & Michael O’Toole & Mary Mulligan

July 29th at 11 a.m.                                  Susan O’Reilly

August 5th at 11 a.m.                                Bill, Mary, John, Joe & Willie Giles

August 11th at 7.30 p.m.                           Mary Mulligan ■   Peter Burke MMM

August 12th at 11 a.m.                              John Joe Fitzhenry

August 15th at 11 a.m.                              Kathleen & Jack Fahy

August 18th at 7.30 p.m.                           Oliver Barry

August 19th at 11 a.m.                              Ellen Burke, Anniversary Mass

Little Chapel Masses

July 28th at 6.30 p.m.                               Michael O’Keeffe & Family

July 29th at 10.30 a.m.                             Olive O’Keeffe, MMM

August 4th at 6.30 p.m.                             James (Jim) Ryan

August 5th at 10.30 a.m.                           John Joe Kinnane

August 11th at 6.30 p.m.                           Ronnie Rearden

August 12th at 10.30 a.m.                         Brian Reilly

August 18th at 6.30 p.m.                           Sean Cahalin, Parents, Brothers & Sisters

August 19th at 10.30 a.m.                         Mary (Mamie) Monaghan (sister of Bridie Joyce)

Batterstown Masses

Sunday, 29th July at 9.30 a.m. John Cullen

Altar Society:                                           Team 4 – 28th July – 4th Aug – A.McNulty, L.Watson & K.McAlesse

 

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Lough Derg

Retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

Kilcloon Macra

Best of luck to Niamh Fagan from Kilcloon Macra who will be representing Meath at the International Miss Macra Festival in Tipperary next weekend. For information contact 086 4093452.

Blackhall Gaels Lotto

3-4-5-20, no winner.

New jackpot is €4,000.   Next draw in The Hatchet Inn on 28th July

Little Chapel Mass for Walter Haefner

On Saturday 15th September at 6.30 p.m. Mass will be celebrated in the Little Chapel for the repose of the soul of Walter Haefner in recognition of his kindness and generosity towards the community of the Little Chapel

1st Friday

Next Friday is the First Friday of the month.   The housebound will be attended as usual.  Mass in Kilcloon at

8.45 a.m. Little Chapel at 10 a.m. and Batterstown at 8 p.m.

X-PERT Programme for Type 2 Diabetes.
The 6 Week X-PERT programme outlines how to manage Type 2 Diabetes giving guidelines on how to manage weight, supermarket shopping, possible complications of diabetes and how to prevent them and the importance of lifestyle, diet and exercise. The course is FREE and is suitable for anyone with Type 2 Diabetes.   The next course will be running in Kilcock GAA from 12th September to 17th October 2012.   (Every Wednesday morning for 6 weeks: 10 a.m – 12.30 p.m)

 

Feeding of the Five Thousand

Were there really five thousand there or is it just a description of a great crowd of people?   We’ll never know.   But we do know that Jesus was such a charismatic figure that people, especially ordinary people followed him everywhere.   They were reassured of their own importance in God’s eyes.   Those who opposed him, the Pharisees or Sadducees, leaders of the people and instructed in the ways of their ancestors, opposed him constantly.   They asked him questions and hoped either to discredit him by his reaction to their questions or get him into trouble with the powers that be that were constantly looking out for people gifted like Jesus who were troublemakers and put down challenges to their Roman ultimate control of the Jewish people.   “Should we pay tribute to Caesar or not?” they asked him at one stage, figuring that no matter how he answered them he was in deep trouble.   To say these people should pay tax to Caesar was to destroy his influence with them.   To say no was to get him into trouble as a subversive.   He answered cleverly, avoiding trouble by asking for a coin on which the tribute was paid.   It had Caesar’s head on it, a guarantee that it was authentic.   By accepting the coin the people were accepting the duties of paying tax.   There were many more instances in which Jesus confounded them who tried to trip him up in his speech.   He had another problem too, bound up with the fact that his presence on our earth was for all men and not just for the small number which he met and mingled with in Judea.   His solution to that problem was gradually revealed to his followers and caused some difficulties.   The gospel in today’s Mass is an illustration of his thinking.  

When the people followed him to the far side of the Sea of Galilee because they had witnessed his miracles and heard him speak, Jesus gathered them round him and sat down on the hill with his disciples.   When he saw the crowd approaching him he asked a practical question; where can these buy some food for people to eat?   He knew well enough what he was going to do there.   Philip told him they had two hundred denarii which would get the people only a small piece of bread each.   Another, Andrew, Peter’s brother told him that there was a small boy there with five loaves made of barley and two fishes.   Philip asked the obvious question, what is that between so many?   Jesus made them sit down.   Then on the grass, for there was room for a large crowd there, he broke the bread and the fish and multiplied them and gave them out as much as was wanted.   Ever practical, he got the disciples to gather up what was over; they filled twelve baskets full so that nothing got wasted.  

Not unreasonably he proved himself vastly popular so that he guessed they wanted to make him king.   He escaped back to the hills by himself.   “This really is the prophet who was to come into the world”, they said.   People continued to follow him, and again, ever practical, he told them that they were following him, not because they were impressed with the signs he gave but because they had got a free meal at the end of the sermon.   “Do not work for food that cannot last, but work for food which endures for eternal life”.    The kind of food the Son of Man is offering you on which the Father, God himself, has set his seal”.  Of course people couldn’t accept what he was saying; it was so much outside their experience.   “I am the bread of life”, he told them, “He who comes to me will never be hungry and he who believes in me will never thirst.   I tell you solemnly” he went on, “If you do not eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood you will not have life in you.”   He went on in this vein and the natural result was that the listeners questioned him.   “How can this man give us his flesh to eat?”   Now naturally many of the disciples walked no more with him.   Jesus didn’t give any further explanation for his comments but turned to his apostles and asked them why they didn’t go away.   Peter gave the only possible answer, “Lord to whom shall we go, you have the words of eternal life”.  

Peter gave the only possible answer, “Lord, to whom shall we go, you have the words of eternal life”.   It was only long afterwards that they and the rest of the disciples realised what he was talking about.   It was at the Last Supper that his plan for remaining on permanently in the world for the nourishment of souls was revealed.   The first sign of that would be was the multiplication of the loaves and fishes in the gospel today.

The bread of life has been multiplied ever since for us all and for all men.   But the multiplication of loaves and fishes has a warning for us too.   Do we really believe that Jesus is present in the bread of life?    Do we surround his presence with proper respect and do we appreciate with proper awe and wonder the fact that God himself, our creator, lives within us if we have constant faith to accept him.   It’s a question each of us has to answer for him or herself.

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

July 22nd 2012

Kilcloon Masses

July 21st at 7.30 p.m.                                James & Mary Mulligan

July 22nd at 11 a.m.                                  Dessie & Patricia O’Brien

July 26th at 8.45 a.m.                               Richard Garry

July 28th at 7.30 p.m.                               Martin & Michael O’Toole & Mary Mulligan

July 29th at 11 a.m.                                  Susan O’Reilly

Little Chapel Masses

July 22nd at 10.30 a.m.                             Olive O’Keeffe, at the request of the Altar Society

July 28th at 6.30 p.m.                               Michael O’Keeffe & Family

July 29th at 10.30 a.m.                             Olive O’Keeffe, MMM

August 4th at 6.30 p.m.                             James (Jim) Ryan

August 5th at 10.30 a.m.                           John Joe Kinnane

August 12th at 10.30 a.m.                         Brian Reilly

Batterstown Masses

Sunday, 29th July at 9.30 a.m. John Cullen

Altar Society:                                           Team 3 - 14th to 21st July: Valerie Ward, Liz. Jennings & C. Murray

Recent Death

Your prayers are requested for the repose of the soul of Eilish Fields (sister in law of Tom Monaghan). RIP.

 

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Lough Derg

Retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

Open Day

An open day will take place at Paula & Thomas Byrne’s garden at Kilglynn on Sunday 22nd July from 1 to 6 p.m. (weather permitting) in aid of Alzheimer’s Society & Hospice.  Tea/coffee will be served.

Blackhall Gaels Lotto

3-4-5-20, no winner.

New jackpot is €4,000.   Next draw in The Hatchet Inn on 28th July

Kilcloon Macra

Many thanks to all who joined us for our Know Your Neighbour weekend Tea after Mass in Kilcloon last weekend. Niamh Fagan from the club will be representing Meath at the International Miss Macra festival in Tipperary on the August bank holiday weekend. For information contact 086 4093452.

Breast Cancer Fundraising Day

A Ladies Tractor Run and Vintage Car Drive will take place in Maynooth on Saturday 28th July from 2 to 5 p.m. in aid of BREAST CANCER.   It will begin at the Tesco Centre in Maynooth and continue on through the main street and finish in the GAA Hall on the Moyglare road.   We are seeking at least 20 ladies to facilitate this drive.   Volunteers to kindly contact Veronica at 01 6289015 or 087 2079932   

X-PERT Programme for Type 2 Diabetes.
The 6 Week X-PERT programme outlines how to manage Type 2 Diabetes giving guidelines on how to manage weight, supermarket shopping, possible complications of diabetes and how to prevent them and the importance of lifestyle, diet and exercise. The course is FREE and is suitable for anyone with Type 2 Diabetes.   The next course will be running in Kilcock GAA from 12th September to 17th October 2012.   (Every Wednesday morning for 6 weeks: 10 a.m - 12.30 p.m)

 

St Paul

St Paul writes of the hostility that existed between the upholders of the old law and the new law of the followers of Christ.   Christ had broken down the barrier that kept them apart.   It was in fact the death on the cross through which Jesus reconciled the followers of the Old Testament, the Jewish people, with the faith of those who were following his own teaching.   Thus he created, says St Paul to the Ephesians, a new man as of both of these, the old and the new.   He restored peace through the cross.   He came to bring the Good News of peace to those who were near at hand.   Both of us, he says, have in the one spirit the one way to come to the Father.

 

Ephesus was for St. Paul a main centre of his preaching and missionary activity.   He wrote at least two of his letters there, one to the Colossians and one to the Galatians.   It was a magnificent city with at least a quarter of a million inhabitants, a centre of pilgrimage for the followers of the Pagan goddess Diana.   In fact, a tribute to Paul, the silversmiths who made souvenirs saw Paul as a threat to their business.   He must have been pretty eloquent.   He was speaking from the public platform that is still there to be seen and a riot broke out with the silversmiths shouting “Great is Diana of the Ephesians”.   So vehement were the attacks on him that Paul had to flee from the city in which he had spent two years, 56 to 58 AD.    It was a hub of the Eastern Mediterranean, a major trade centre and from the cosmopolitan population some of whom rallied to his teaching were among the first organised group of Christians.

 

Paul wrote his letter to them which contained his vision of creation.   He had the gift of looking profoundly on the message brought into our world by Christ, whom, albeit lately, Paul adopted and spent his life sharing with the Pagans he met like the sophisticated population of Ephesus.   At the centre of his message was one which in different ways paralleled the preaching of Christ.   Christ preached mainly to the ordinary people and told them they were as important in God’s eyes as the rulers of the world.   In fact, in his famous beatitudes he gave to ordinary people for the first time in history hope and assured them they were special in the eyes of God, like the poor in spirit, the meek, and those who thirsted for justice and never got it.   In fact the gospel largely concerned the outcasts of contemporary society like lepers, tax collectors, the prostitutes, Samaritans.   Jesus ignored the structures of wealth and importance that characterised society in his own day as of course it has characterised society before and since.   It’s both a warning and an encouragement that in the eternity stakes we are all equal.

 

In St. Paul it was the same - it is of course pure Christianity, even if often forgotten.   Paul in his letters explored the eternity dimension of creation.  He was asking his converts to look beyond the everyday worry and preoccupations that characterises ordinary life in every age and look up to our final destiny and our part in God’s plan for the human race.   Just as Jesus told us that we were adopted sons of God and called to a destiny of living with him for eternity, so St. Paul speaks of the breaking down of the barriers between Jews and Gentiles and the delivery by Christ of peace to humans so that they would form a single body and be reconciled to God.   Jesus came, Paul told the Ephesians, to bring the Good News of peace to those who had fallen away from God and those who were near at hand.   Through him, both of them have formed one spirit and the way to come to the Father.   The peace he speaks of is the peace that comes from knowing that God is always with us and really nothing else matters.   Paul was one of the greatest of the apostles; the rest, even Peter, were very ordinary people who followed their own trades, some fishermen, at least one tax collector, one doctor, but Paul was different.   He was obviously trained in the intellectual discipline of the Jewish race.   He was a Pharisee, learned in the wisdom of his race and acquainted with the thought processes of the Greeks.   What he left us in his letters has served us well as the best exposition of our faith with the possible exception of the letters and gospels of St. John.   

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

July 15th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

July 14th at 7.30 p.m.                               Michael Lillis

July 15th at 11 a.m.                                  Ellen Burke & Thomas Weldon

July 21st at 7.30 p.m.                                James & Mary Mulligan

July 22nd at 11 a.m.                                  Dessie & Patricia O’Brien

July 26th at 8.45 a.m.                               Richard Garry

July 28th at 7.30 p.m.                               Martin & Michael O’Toole & Mary Mulligan

July 29th at 11 a.m.                                  Susan O’Reilly

Little Chapel Masses

July 15th at 10.30 a.m.                             Baby Liam Browne, 5th Anniversary

July 22nd at 10.30 a.m.                             Olive O’Keeffe, at the request of the Altar Society

July 28th at 6.30 p.m.                               Michael O’Keeffe & Family

July 29th at 10.30 a.m.                             Olive O’Keeffe, MMM

August 5th at 10.30 a.m.                           John Joe Kinnane

August 12th  at 10.30 a.m.                        Brian Reilly

Batterstown Masses

July 15th at 9.30 a.m.                               Mickey Woods

July 17th at 8 p.m.                                    Michael & Elizabeth Malone

                                                                Harry, Francs & Sean Monaghan

Altar Society:                                           Team 3 - 14th to 21st July: M. Ferris

 

Walter Haefner – Moyglare Stud

A Memorial Mass to celebrate the life of Walter Haefner and his gift to Maynooth College and to the parish of Kilcloon will be held on 20th July at 12 noon in the church atSt. Patricks College.

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Lough Derg

One day retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

Kilcloon Macra

Kilcloon Macra will host their annual "Tea after Mass" as part of the Know Your Neighbour weekend on Sunday 15th July in the grounds of Kilcloon Church following 11 a.m Mass. All welcome.    It's free!

Breast Cancer Fundraising Day

A Ladies Tractor Run and Vintage Car Drive will take place in Maynooth on Saturday 28th July from 2 to 5 p.m. in aid of BREAST CANCER.   It will begin at the Tesco Centre in Maynooth and continue on through the main street and finish in the GAA Hall on the Moyglare road.   We are seeking at least 20 ladies to facilitate this drive.   Volunteers to kindly contact Veronica at 01 6289015 or 087 2079932   

Healing Retreat

John Pridmore and St. Patrick’s Community shall be leading a retreat in Ards Friary, Creeslough, Co. Donegal from the 20th to the 22nd of July. This is an opportunity to receive immense healing from our past. All are welcome.  For further information and bookings contact Ards Friary on 074 – 913 8909

Dochas Nasamu Orphanage – Used Clothing Appeal

Is an Irish run and Irish built orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya   We are holding a used clothing appeal of ladies, gents and children’s clothes, shoes, household linens i.e. towels, sheets, blankets, soft toys, handbags etc.  This appeal will take place on Tuesday 17th July, up till 12 noon, at Kilcloon and The Little Chapel Church Grounds.  For further information, please contact Marie on 087 6890995.

 

St Paul

St Paul writes of the hostility that existed between the upholders of the old law and the new gathering of the followers of Christ.   Christ had broken down the barrier that kept them apart.   It was in fact the death on the cross through which Jesus reconciled the followers of the Old Testament, the Jewish people with the faith of those who were following his own teaching.   Thus he created, says Paul to the Ephesians, a new man out of both of these, the old and the new.   He restored peace through the cross.   He came to bring the good news of peace to those who were near at hand.   Both of us he says have, in the one spirit, our way to come to the Father.

 

Ephesus was for St. Paul a main centre of his preaching and missionary activity.   He wrote at least two of his letters there, one to the Colossians and one to the Galatians.   It was a magnificent city with at least a quarter of a million inhabitants, a centre of pilgrimage for followers of the Pagan goddess Diana.   In fact, a tribute to Paul, the silversmiths who made souvenirs saw Paul as a threat to their business.   He must have been pretty eloquent.   He was speaking from the public platform that is still there to be seen and a riot broke out with the silversmiths shouting “Great is Diana of the Ephesians”.   So vehement were the attacks on him that Paul had to flee from the city in which he had spent two years, 56 to 58 AD.    It was a hub of Eastern Mediterranean, a major trade centre and Paul from the cosmopolitan population some of whom rallied to his teaching and were among the first organised group of Christians.

 

Paul wrote his letter to them which contained his vision of creation.   He had the gift of looking profoundly on the message brought to our world by Christ, whom, albeit lately, Paul adopted and spent his life sharing with the Pagans he met like the sophisticated population of Ephesus.

 

At the centre of his message was one which in different ways paralleled the preaching of Christ.   Christ preached mainly to the ordinary people and told them they were as important in God’s eyes as the rulers of the world.   In fact, in his famous beatitudes he gave to ordinary people for the first time in history hope and assured them they were special in the eyes of God, like the poor in spirit, the meek, and those who thirsted for justice and never got it.   The fact that the gospel largely concerned the outcasts of contemporary society like lepers, the tax collectors, the prostitutes, Samaritans.   Jesus ignored the structures of wealth and importance that characterised society in his own day as of course it has characterised society before and since.   It’s both a warning and an encouragement that in the eternity stakes we are all equal.

 

St. Paul was the same - it is of course pure Christianity, even if often forgotten.   Paul in his letters explored the eternity dimension of creation.  He was asking his converts to look beyond the everyday worry and preoccupations that characterises ordinary life in every age and look up to our final destiny and our part in God’s plan for the human race.   Just as Jesus told us that we were adopted sons of God and called to a destiny of living with him for eternity, so St. Paul speaks of the breaking down of the barriers between Jews and Gentiles and the delivery by Christ of peace to humans so that they would form a single body and be reconciled to God.   He came, Paul told the Ephesians, to bring the good news of peace to those who had fallen away from God and those who were near at hand.   Through him, both of them have formed one spirit and the way to come to the Father.

 

The peace he speaks of is the peace that comes from knowing that God is always with us and really nothing else matters.   Paul was one of the greatest of the apostles, the rest, even Peter, were very ordinary people who followed their own trades, some fishermen, at least one tax collector, one doctor, but Paul was different.   He was obviously trained in the intellectual discipline of the Jewish race.   He was a Pharisee, learned in the tone of his race and acquainted with the thought processes of the Greeks.   What he left us in his letters has served us well as the best exposition of our faith with the possible exception of the letters and gospels of St. John.  

 

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

July 8th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

July 7th at 7.30 p.m.                                    Frank & Gabriel Cassidy

July 14th at 7.30 p.m.                                  Michael Lillis

July 15th at 11 a.m.                                     Ellen Burke & Thomas Weldon

July 21st at 7.30 p.m.                                  James & Mary Mulligan

July 22nd at 11 a.m.                                    Dessie & Patricia O’Brien

July 26th at 8.45 a.m.                                  Richard Garry

July 28th at 7.30 p.m.                                  Martin & Michael O’Toole & Mary Mulligan

July 29th at 11 a.m.                                     Susan O’Reilly

Little Chapel Masses

July 7th at 6.30 p.m.                                    John & Kathleen Conneally

July 15th at 10.30 a.m.                                Baby Liam Browne, 5th Anniversary

July 22nd at 10.30 a.m.                                Olive O’Keeffe, at the request of the Altar Society

July 29th at 10.30 a.m.                                Olive O’Keeffe, MMM

August 5th at 10.30 a.m.                              John Joe Kinnane

August 12th  at 10.30 a.m.                            Brian Reilly

Batterstown Masses

July 8th at 9.30 a.m.                                    Patrick & Annie McGowan

July 10th at 8 p.m.                                      Maisie Smith

July 15th at 9.30 a.m.                                  Mickey Woods

Altar Society:                                           Team 3 - 14th to 21st July: M. Ferris & E. Cullen

 

Recent Death

Your prayers are requested for the repose of the soul of Olive O’Keeffe of Kilglynn, who was buried in Kilcloon cemetery after Requiem Mass at 12 noon on

Friday 6th July.

Walter Haefner – Moyglare Stud

A Memorial Mass to celebrate the life of Walter Haefner and his gift to Maynooth College and to the parish of Kilcloon will be held on 20th July at 12 noon in the church atSt. Patricks College.

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive.   Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Blessing of the Graves – Rodanstown

Blessing of the graves in cemetery at Rodenstown on Wednesday July 11th at 7 p.m. and Mass and blessing of the graves in the cemetery at Balfeighan will take place at 8 p.m. on Wednesday 11th July.

Adoration

Invitation to anyone who might wish to give time in adoration each or any Thursday in Batterstown - 30 minutes or one hour periods fit the daily schedule.

Lough Derg

One day retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

 

 

The Rosary

 

The Rosary is many things.   It is a collection of prayers – some five hundred years old.  In its various divisions it suggests to us to think on the mysteries that sum up the life of Jesus.   There are four sets of these mysteries, those associated with joyful events in his life, sorrowful events in his life where he was unbelievably treated abominably by ourselves, the glorious mysteries that help us to realise the moments of triumph in his life.   Then there are the mysteries of light given to us by Blessed John Paul II which concern the way there was a direct intervention in human affairs of the life of heaven.

 

The joyful mysteries tell us of the dialogue between God’s messenger called the Angel Gabriel and a young girl of great virtue who rather unbelievably was picked out of all the women on earth by God to be the mother of his son.   She was greeted by Gabriel as full of grace; in time we realised that from the first moment of her existence she was free from our inheritance, the sin of Adam and its consequences, death itself.   The next mystery we are asked to think about was naturally the birth of Jesus Christ as a vulnerable child, hounded by the chief secular authority, the King of Judea, Herod.   Another mystery was the way Joseph and Mary, like ourselves, brought Jesus the child to his father in the temple at Jerusalem.   The last joyful mystery was the working out of the jolt that Joseph and Mary experienced when they realised their young teenager was lost when they were making a family pilgrimage to Jerusalem.   They found him revealing his talents, hearing the learned doctors of the temple and asking them questions.

 

The next set of mysteries concern the terrible treatment meted out to Jesus that culminated in his crucifixion as a common criminal.   It was breath-taking if you think about it.   Here was the Word of God himself through whom God had created the universe treated by human beings, in other words by ourselves, as a common criminal.

 

The next set of mysteries concern the way Jesus showed himself to the apostles when he did what no human being had done before him, rose from the dead and sponsored the descent of the Holy Spirit on his followers to give them the strength to cease being vulnerable fearful people and spread the Good News of the resurrection and our salvation to the people of all races and places, in other words to found what we call the church, the gathering of human beings who were to be his presence in the world until the end of time.   In the process he gave his mother to us as an intercessor with God to reinforce the forgiveness of our sins.   In the process Jesus gave us the chief and last mystery of light, a guarantee that he would be with us always throughout the world in the simplest of fashions in the form of his body and blood in the Eucharist.   In the various mysteries of the Rosary we have an opportunity of thinking about the essential mysteries of our faith, the adventures if you like of Jesus when he came on earth and left it.   He brought us the gift of forgiveness of sins and of immortality with himself forever.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

July 1st 2012 – Feast of St. Oliver Plunkett

1st Friday

Next Friday is the First Friday of the month.   The housebound will be attended as usual.  Mass in Kilcloon at 8.45 a.m. Little Chapel at 10 a.m. and Batterstown at 8 p.m.

 

Kilcloon Masses

June 30th at 7.30 p.m.                                 Sarah Hurley

July 7th at 7.30 p.m.                                    Frank & Gabriel Cassidy

July 14th at 7.30 p.m.                                  Michael Lillis

July 15th at 11 a.m.                                     Ellen Burke & Thomas Weldon

Little Chapel Masses

June 30th at 6.30 p.m.                                 Mary Murphy, late of Bridestream

July 1st at 10.30 a.m.                                  Maureen & Michael Byrne, late of Kilglynn

July 2nd at 10 a.m.                                      Mary Josephine Cleary

July 7th at 6.30 p.m.                                    John & Kathleen Conneally

July 15th at 10.30 a.m.                                Baby Liam Browne, 5th Anniversary

Batterstown Masses

July 3rd at 8 p.m.                                        Jimmy Collins

July 8th at 9.30 a.m.                                    Patrick & Anne McGowan

Altar Society:                                           Team  2:     30th June to 7th July: Ann O’Hora, M.Corrigan & B.Heaney

 

Recent Death

R.I.P – The remains of Peter Burke will be brought to his house in Pagestown from 2 to 10 p.m. on Saturday and again they will be reposing at home from 12 noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday.   Removal on Sunday to Kilcloon Church, arriving at 5.30 p.m.   Burial after 12 Mass on Monday to the adjoining cemetery.   Also for Mary (Mamie) Monaghan (sister of Bridie Joyce).  

Walter Haefner – Moyglare Stud

Your prayers are requested for Walter Haefner, who died in his home city of Zurich.   He was a great benefactor of Maynooth College Seminary and also of this parish.  A memorial service will be held in Maynooth College at a later date.

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Wednesday, September 12th to Monday, 17th September led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive. Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Cemetery Sunday

Cemetery Sunday in Kilcloon will take place on Sunday July 1st.   Mass will take place in the New Cemetery at 11 a.m. followed by blessing of the graves in the Old Cemetery at approximately 12.30 p.m.

Cemetery Sunday – Batterstown

Mass will take place in Batterstown Cemetery on Sunday, July 1st at 7 p.m.   No morning Mass in Batterstown on July 1st.

Cemetery Sunday – Rodanstown

Blessing of the graves in cemetery at Rodenstown on Wednesday July 11th at 7 p.m. and Mass and blessing of the graves in the cemetery at Balfeighan will take place at 8 p.m. on Wednesday 11th July.

Altar Society

There was a collection for the Altar Society which came to €350.00 - a very generous sum.   Many thanks to all who contributed so generously.

Adoration.

Invitation to anyone who might wish to give time in adoration each or any Thursday in Batterstown. 30 mins or one hour periods fits the daily schedule.

Lough Derg

One day retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

 

 

 

St. Oliver Plunkett

 

There is a small town in Germany called Lamspring near Hildeheim of which Oliver is a patron.   It is not far from Frankfurt.  Every year at the end of August there is an open air procession through the main street of the town ending at the 15th century parish church.   It’s led by the local bishop and attracts a big number of parishioners and people from the neighbourhood.   It is in honour of our St. Oliver Plunkett.   It has it roots in the arrival in 1684 of the body of St. Oliver, brought there by Father Corker, a Benedictine who was in prison in Newgate in London with Oliver Plunkett in the days before his execution at Tyburn.   The body of Oliver Plunkett was brought there by Father Corker when he was asked by Oliver to look after it after his execution in 1681.   He brought it to Lambspring which had a Benedictine monastery and it became a centre of devotion to Oliver who was seen as a martyr or someone who, through his death had given witness to his faith.   There the body remained until 1803 when the Prussian king expelled the Benedictines, though the yearly procession still took place and has taken place every year to the present day.   The relics of Oliver Plunkett were carefully guarded in Lambspring by the people until 1883 when they were transferred to the Benedictine monastery of Downside in England where the monks settled after their expulsion from Germany.   The major relics of Oliver Plunkett still survive there in the now famous college and boarding school.   In the 1880s the cause of beatification of Oliver Plunkett was introduced by Pope Leo XIII and perhaps as a gesture to the new Irish Free State, Oliver Plunkett was beatified in 1920.   He was canonised or declared a saint in 1975.   And the first church dedicated to him with the title of saint was the parish church of Kilcloon.   He is the patron saint of our parish.

 

He was born in Oldcastle in 1625 where the Plunkett’s had a small estate.  Having sons in every generation since the Norman Conquest, they had married heiresses from various parts of Meath, at Rathregan, Killeen and Dunsany.   In the 1640s it did seem that the confederation of Kilkenny as it was called heralded the appearance of a relatively independent Ireland.   The pope sent an envoy called Scarampi who was replaced in 1643 by a proper nuncio called Rinnucini.   Oliver Plunkett at 16 years of age decided to go with Scarampi when he was recalled to Rome and there he was eventually ordained and became a professor in the college of propaganda where he became an agent or dealer in Irish business for a number of Irish bishops.   It did seem that he was there for life on the continent, but in 1669 when the Archbishop of Armagh died in exile on the continent where he had gone because of the depredations of Cromwell, Oliver was chosen as primate.   He became a bishop in Ghent in Belgium and returned to the chaos that was the church in Ireland after the Cromwellian years.   There had not been a residential bishop in Armagh for at least 20 years and as Oliver reported to Rome in his first years in Armagh he confirmed ten thousand men and women.   He organised synods in the Northern Province and slowly put order on the chaos he had experienced when he first came home to Ireland.   In the process naturally he made enemies among the clergy, both secular and religious.   When a plot was organised to replace the Catholic James, Duke of York, the king’s brother with a Protestant heir to the throne (King Charles II had no legitimate family) it had to have an Irish dimension.   Oliver Plunkett was accused of plotting a French invasion of Ireland and was arrested.   He was tried in Dundalk and a Protestant jury acquitted him.  He was brought to London where a travesty of a trial had him sentenced to death and executed.   He was the last Catholic to be executed in Tyburn in London.   Oliver’s accusers were discredited and in fact a period of calm ensued because everyone realised how unjust Oliver’s trial had been, as was the way in which the judge blocked the witnesses that had come over from Ireland to defend him at his trial.

 

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Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

June 24th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

June 23rd at 7.30 p.m.                                 Mrs. Conneely

June 24th at 11 a.m.                                    Barbara Dunbar

June 30th at 7.30 p.m.                                 Sarah Hurley

July 7th at 7.30 p.m.                                    Frank & Gabriel Cassidy

July 14th at 7.30 p.m.                                  Michael Lillis

July 15th at 11 a.m.                                     Ellen Burke & Thomas Weldon

Little Chapel Masses

June 23rd at 6.30 p.m.                                 Dr. James Rearden MMM

June 24th at 10.30 a.m.                                Emer Mallon

June 25th at 10 a.m.                                    Martin & Mary Tuohy & Hannah Steel

June 30th at 6.30 p.m.                                 Mary Murphy, late of Bridestream

July 1st at 10.30 a.m.                                  Maureen & Michael Byrne, late of Kilglynn

July 2nd at 10 a.m.                                      Mary Josephine Cleary

July 7th at 6.30 p.m.                                    John & Kathleen Conneally

July 15th at 10.30 a.m.                                Baby Liam Browne, 5th Anniversary

Batterstown Masses

June 24th at 9.30 a.m.                              Maisie & Jim O’Sullivan

June 26th at 8 p.m.                                   Philip Daly

                                                                Margaret & Ulick McDonnell & daughter Helen

Altar Society:                                           Team  2:     30th June to 7th July: Ann O’Hora, M.Corrigan & B.Heaney

 

Recent Death

R.I.P – Tragically in Australia, Peter Burke, son of Jimmy and Esther Burke.   Funeral arrangements later.

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. 12 - 15 Sept, led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive. Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Cemetery Sunday

Cemetery Sunday in Kilcloon will take place on Sunday July 1st.   Mass will take place in the New Cemetery at 11 a.m. followed by blessing of the graves in the Old Cemetery at approximately 12.30 p.m.

Cemetery Sunday – Batterstown

Mass will take place in Batterstown Cemetery on Sunday, July 1st at 7 p.m.   No morning Mass in Batterstown on July 1st.

St. Vincent de Paul Collection

St. Brigid’s Conference of St. Vincent de Paul Kilcock will hold a church gate collection on Saturday, June 23rd and Sunday, June 24th after Masses in the Little Chapel.

Kilcloon Macra

Meath Macra will be having a Race Night fundraiser in The Silver Tankard on Saturday 23rd June at 8 p m. All support would be gratefully appreciated. For information contact Marie Claire on 086 4093452

Pilot Book Rental Scheme
Kilcloon N.S intend to run a pilot book rental scheme in the school commencing in September and we are looking for volunteers to help coordinate the programme. If you are in a position to help the school we would be very grateful.   Please contact Loretta McCann at 086 8595107

 

 

John the Baptist

Jesus paid John the Baptist the greatest compliment he paid to anyone, “Of all the children born of woman, there is no greater than John the Baptist.   He was the last and the greatest of the prophets.   He was the culmination of a series of Jewish prophets that stretched back to Abraham & Moses.   He was the one that Isaiah wrote about, “See I’m going to send my messenger before you, he will prepare a way before you.”   In adulthood John described himself as a voice crying in the wilderness, prepare a way for the Lord, and make his path straight.   He was in fact fulfilling the promise made by God himself over a thousand years before that, that he would send his messiah or messenger to communicate to the Jewish people that their sins would be forgiven.   His origin was miraculous.   It was his father’s time as a priest of the temple at Jerusalem to offer incense and he was interrupted by an angel who assured him of his high favour in God’s eyes and though his wife was on in years and was barren, that she would conceive a son who would be great in the sight of the Lord.   And so was born John the Baptist.   People from the surrounding countryside recognised that a miracle had taken place and word spread throughout the surrounding countryside, “What think you will this one be?   For the hand of the Lord has touched him”.   In adulthood he retreated to the desert preparing for his mission in life, the preparation for the baptism and life of Jesus.   In character he was a man who did not shrink from telling the truth, but was charismatic in his preaching.    People flocked from all sides to the banks of the Jordan River; there he baptised them as a gesture of repentance for their sins.   His reputation spread as far as Jerusalem where King Herod wished to hear his eloquence.   But Herod did not expect the truth, for John denounced the marriage arrangements of his brother Philip’s wife, she was called Herodias, and she left him and married Herod.   And a great hatred ensued and Herod had John put in prison, but was reluctant to execute him for his outrageous and outspoken remarks.   Herodias nursed her hatred for John’s condemnation of her marriage arrangements and at last found an occasion to indulge it.   Herod, in a drunken state and impressed by the dancing of his stepdaughter had promised her anything that she asked.   Being a dutiful daughter she went to ask her mother what she should ask for, and Herodias, still nursing her hatred for John’s denunciation of her marrying Herod, asked for the head of John the Baptist in a dish.    Herod was afraid to refuse her and had John beheaded.   Such was the career of John the Baptist, the cousin of Jesus who had a fatal habit of telling the truth.   But he was a charismatic speaker too, who not only attracted vast crowds to his preaching on the banks of the Jordan River, and in the process attracted the attentions of Herod but also reminded his audience that he was merely the one who created an atmosphere of expectation, that the messiah or God’s messenger ‘s coming was imminent.   From his preaching people began to wonder was he, John, the Christ himself?   But he disillusioned them, “I baptise you with water, but someone is coming who is more powerful than I am, and I am not fit to undo the strap of his sandals; he will baptise you with the Holy Spirit and fire”.   It was thus that John prepared for the public life of Jesus and when Jesus began his public life, the apostles of John, Peter among them, followed him and John faced martyrdom in Herod’s prison because of the hatred of Herodias.   It was caused by John’s habit of telling the truth no matter what was the consequence of so doing.

 

Meath Partnership

Meath Partnership are holding a seminar on Rural Recreation on Thursday 28th at 6.30 p.m in Trim Castle Hotel.    If you are a community group that has an idea for a rural recreational project and would like to avail of 75% funding, then this is the workshop for you.   Please call Aine on 046 9280790 or email aine.duffy@meathpartnership.ie to reserve a place.

Text Alert Meeting

The Text Alert Committee would like to thank most sincerely the large number of people who attended their launch of the new Text Alert System.   It was a very successful meeting.   We would like to remind parishioners and interested parties who wish to sign up that they can do so in Bill Clarke’s shop/post office.   Also Text Alert high viz vests can be purchased at a cost of €5 in Bill’s.

Adoration.

Invitation to anyone who might wish to give time in adoration each or any Thursday in Batterstown. 30 mins or one hour periods fits the daily schedule.

Lough Derg

One day retreat on Saturday, September 1st.   No fasting or walking barefoot.   Early booking essential.   Contact: 01 8259596

 

 

 

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

June 17th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

June 16th at 7.30 p.m.                              Deceased members of the Regan Family

June 17th at 11 a.m.                 Maurice & Paul Walsh

June 23rd at 7.30 p.m.                              Mrs Conneally

June 24th at 11 a.m.                 Barbara Dunbar

June 30th at 7.30 p.m.                              Sarah Hurley

Little Chapel Masses

June 16th at 6.30 p.m.                              Christine & James Robinson

June 17th at 10.30 a.m.                            Paddy Corcoran

June 17th at 12 noon, St. Coca’s           Emer Mallon, nee Browne, MMM

June 18th at 10 a.m.                 Michael, Nora & daughter Anne Mallon

June 23rd at 6.30 p.m.                              Dr. James Rearden MMM

June 24th at 10.30 a.m.                            Emer Mallon

June 25th at 10 a.m.                 Martin & Mary Tuohy & Hannah Steel

Batterstown Masses

June 19th at 8 p.m.                                   Sean Ennis, Quarryland

June 24th at 9.30 a.m.                              Maisie & Jim O’Sullivan

Altar Society:                                           Team 1: 16th to 23rd June: C.Joyce,I.Corcoran & Anne O’Meara

 

The Study of Theology

The Dominicans are offering a programme of Theology leading up to a degree (BTH) in the Distance Learning format.   People are enabled to study from home with occasional study days and with online support of tutors.   Already hundreds have completed the programme to some level.   Contact The Priory Institute, Tallaght Village, Dublin 24 or call 01 4048124 or 4048127

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. 12 - 15 Sept, led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive. Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Cemetery Sunday

Cemetery Sunday in Kilcloon will take place on Sunday July 1st.   Mass will take place in the New Cemetery at 11 a.m. followed by blessing of the graves in the Old Cemetery at approximately

12.30 p.m.

Cemetery Sunday – Batterstown

Mass will take place in Batterstown Cemetery on Sunday, July 1st at 7 p.m.   No morning Mass in Batterstown on July 1st.

St. Vincent de Paul Collection

St. Brigid’s Conference of St. Vincent de Paul Kilcock will hold a church gate collection on Saturday, June 23rd and Sunday, June 24th after Masses in the Little Chapel.

Kilcloon Macra

Meath Macra will be having a Race Night fundraiser in The Silver Tankard on Saturday 23rd June at 8pm. All support would be gratefully appreciated. For information contact Marie Claire on 086 4093452

Pilot Book Rental Scheme
Kilcloon N.S intend to run a pilot book rental scheme in the school commencing in September and we are looking for volunteers to help coordinate the programme. If you are in a position to help the school we would be very grateful.   Please contact Loretta McCann at 086 8595107

 

 

The Eucharistic Congress

 

Every four years there is a Eucharistic Congress in some great city of the world.   Usually it takes place in a city when faith has been so strong, but where there have of late been weaknesses in its practice.   The Congress has been held to focus on the way the presence of Our Lord in the Eucharist has been emphasised to enable members of the Catholic community to deepen their faith in the presence among us of the life of Jesus himself.

 

Two thousand years ago Jesus told his audience that unless they ate his body and drank his blood they would not have life in them.   His audience was shocked, and as the gospel of St. John tells us, many ceased walking with him or listening to his words.   When he asked the apostles who were listening why they did not go away from him Peter, the leader, made an act of faith on their behalf in the event, “Lord” he told him, “To whom shall we go?   You have the words of eternal life”.   Peter didn’t understand what he was saying but he believed what was being said because the Lord himself had said it.   It was long afterwards before they understood what he meant.   He gradually introduced them to his intentions for them.   He brought three apostles to a mountain where he was transfigured before them and communicated with the founding fathers of their race, Moses and Elijah.   And a voice came from heaven from God the Father who gave his approval to the transfigured Jesus, “This is my beloved son, listen to him.”   And at his Last Supper before his crucifixion he took the most universal of food, bread and wine, and revealed fully the intention of surviving death and living with all men for all time to nourish them and fulfil for them God’s intention of sending his messenger to enable the sins of men to be forgiven.   He lives among them in the modest form of bread and wine which has been consecrated by a priest and will live among them until the end of time.   It is that gift to us all that we celebrate and give thanks for in a special way at a Eucharistic Congress.   The Congress has attracted thousands of believers from each of the four continents of the world to thank Jesus again for coming among us as God’s messenger, the living presence of the creating God.

 

For ourselves the Eucharistic Congress will be as it was intended to be, if we deepen our awareness of the presence of Christ among us in the forms that he intended, under the appearance of bread and wine.   Our awareness of his presence among us gives us a direct awareness of the presence among us of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit themselves.   It will take us into the presence of the Blessed Trinity among us, and become as he himself assures us and allows us to become adopted sons of God and heirs of the kingdom of heaven.   What an extraordinary privilege we have been blessed with by our faith, the very presence of our creator.   What an extraordinary privilege we have been blessed with by our faith, the very living presence of our creator among us and the promise of everlasting life.

 

Community Text Alert – Date change

Public Meeting to launch the Community Text Alert in the Kilcloon & surrounding area will now take place on Tuesday 19th June at 7 p.m. in Kilcloon N.S.  instead of 18th June which was previously advertised in this bulletin.    People wishing to sign up for membership are requested to bring along €10.   Enquiries to Mick at 087 2401933.  All welcome.   

 

 

 

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

June 10th 2012

Kilcloon Masses

June 9th at 7.30 p.m.                                Kevin Cummins

June 10th at 11 a.m.                 Seamus Kennedy MMM

June 16th at 7.30 p.m.                              Deceased members of the Regan Family

June 17th at 11 a.m.                 Maurice & Paul Walsh

June 23rd at 7.30 p.m.                              Mrs Conneely

June 24th at 11 a.m.                 Barbara Dunbar

June 30th at 7.30 p.m.                              Sarah Hurley

Little Chapel Masses

June 9th at 6.30 p.m.                                Elizabeth & Michael Byrne ■ Mary & Peter Smith

June 10th at 10.30 a.m.                            Aidan Keane, 1st Anniversary

June 16th at 6.30 p.m.                              Christine & James Robinson

June 17th at 10.30 a.m.                            Paddy Corcoran

June 23rd at 6.30 p.m.                              Dr. James Rearden MMM

June 24th at 10.30 a.m.                            Emer Mallon

Altar Society:                                           Team 1: 16th to 23rd June: C.Joyce,I.Corcoran & Anne O’Meara

 

R.I.P: Jerome O Connor, Kerry. (Marian Casserly's father).  Patricia Cavanagh, Pelletstown.  

Also Eilish Regan, Formerly of Kilcloon Co. Meath, who died in Belfast.

The Study of Theology

The Dominicans are offering a programme of Theology leading up to a degree (BTH) in the Distance Learning format.   People are enabled to study from home with occasional study days and with online support of tutors.   Already hundreds have completed the programme to some level.   Contact The Priory Institute, Tallaght Village, Dublin 24 or call 01 4048124 or 4048127

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. 12 - 15 Sept, led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive. Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Blackhall Gaels Lotto

15-17-23-27, no winner, new jackpot is €3,400.   Next draw will take place in Caffrey’s of Batterstown on 2nd June 2012.

Eucharistic Congress

Eucharistic Congress;   Begins on 10th June. People are invited to decorate houses with any flags and colours leading up to the event.

Community Text Alert

Public Meeting to launch the Community Text Alert in the Kilcloon & surrounding area will take place on Monday, 18th June at 8 p.m. in Kilcloon N.S.   People wishing to sign up for membership are requested to bring along €10.   Enquiries to Mick at 087 2401933.  

All welcome.   

Kilcloon Batterstown Drama Group

The cast and crew wish to thank most sincerely all who supported their production last weekend. The proceeds are going to the Chernobyl Children's Trust and a fund for a parish defibrillator.

Mass in Batterstown

No Mass in Batterstown on Tuesday next, June 12th.

Kilcloon Macra

The next club meeting will take place on Thursday 14th June at 8pm in Batterstown. For information contact

086 4093452

 

 

 

The Blessed Eucharist

 

Jesus, Son of God, had come into our world.   But accepting the limitations of being a human being too, he was faced with the problem of communicating his message to people in various parts of the world and to those who were to come in the world ages after him.   After all, he was born into a small insignificant part of the world, an obscure part of what had become the Roman world.   He had prepared for his mission it is true, by choosing the race among whom he had been born, and preparing for his coming by sending people of vast consequence, like the prophets, Moses, Jeremiah and the other prophets who preserved the presence of God in the Jewish race and handed it on to succeeding generations with a God given promise that he would send a messenger or messiah to enlighten the Jewish race on his plans for the whole human race.   And so it was.   It was Jesus who was God’s messenger and he proceeded in his preaching to turn upside down the conventional way the world was organised.   He told the people who flocked around him that they were important people in God’s eyes.   They had never thought that they were anything more than existing purely to serve those who ruled the country.   They learned that they were high in the eyes of God.   They learned that they were adopted sons of God, heirs of the kingdom of heaven.   They learned that all men were equal in the sight of God and were called to an eternity of happiness with him.

 

But the question remained.   How were all these teachings to be transmitted to the people of the world?   That was the problem facing God’s messenger to men.   And he solved it after a careful consideration.   He told his listeners that he was the bread of life.   “He who comes to me will never be hungry; he who believes in me shall never thirst.   All that the Father gives me will come to me and whoever comes to me I shall not turn away.   It is my Father’s will that whoever sees the Son and believes in him shall have eternal life and that I shall raise him up on the last day”.

 

The reaction of the crowd who heard him was one of complete disbelief.   Surely this is Jesus the son of Joseph, they said, we know his father and mother, how can he say I have come down from heaven?   Jesus said in reply, “Stop complaining to each other.   No one can come to me unless he is drawn first by the Father who sent me and I will raise him up on the last day”.   It is written in the prophecy, they will all be taught by God and to hear the teaching of the Father and learn from it is to come to me.   Not that anyone had seen the Father except the one who came from God, he had seen the Father.   I tell you solemnly everyone who believes has eternal life.   I am the bread of life.   Your father’s ate the manna in the desert, they are dead.   Anyone who eats this bread will live forever.   I am the living bread which has come down from heaven and the bread that I shall give is my flesh for the life of the world.  No wonder there were many arguments among the listeners, but Jesus insisted, I tell you most solemnly if you do not eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood you will not have life in you.   Anyone who does eat my flesh and drink my blood has eternal life and I shall raise him up on the last day.   He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood lives in me and I live in him.

 

He chose the most ordinary of food, bread and wine that can be found all over the world in every community to be transformed by the words of the priest into his body and blood.   It is an awesome thing that there on the modest altars of the world is the very body and blood of our creator as spoken by himself to the people he was preaching to 2000 years ago.   The question is do we appreciate the extraordinary privilege that we have, given us almost casually, when we offer Mass and receive at Mass his body and his blood.

 

 

 

 

Kilcloon, Batterstown & Little Chapel Parish Newsletter

Rev. Stan Deegan  P.P. Tel: 01 8259267   Rev. G. Rice P.E. Tel: 01 6286252   www.kilcloon.com

June 3rd 2012

Kilcloon Masses

June 2nd at 7.30 p.m.                  Donor’s intention

June 3rd at 11 a.m.                      The Curran Family ■ Mary Moore

June 6th at 8.45 a.m.                   Fodhla Murray

June 9th at 7.30 p.m.                   Kevin Cummins

First Friday

Next Friday is the First Friday of the month.   The housebound will be attended as usual.   Masses in Kilcloon at 8.45 a.m. Little Chapel at 10 a.m. and Batterstown at

8 p.m.

June 10th at 11 a.m.                    Seamus Kennedy MMM

June 16th at 7.30 p.m.                 Deceased members of the Regan Family

June 17th at 11 a.m.                    Maurice & Paul Walsh

June 23rd at 7.30 p.m.                 Mrs Conneely

June 24th at 11 a.m.                    Barbara Dunbar

June 30th at 7.30 p.m.                 Sarah Hurley

Little Chapel Masses

June 2nd at 6.30 p.m.                  Jim Farrell MMM

June 3rd at 10.30 a.m.                 Mary Stone & Jason Stone

June 9th at 6.30 p.m.                   Elizabeth & Michael Byrne ■ Mary & Peter Smith

June 10th at 10.30 a.m.                Aidan Keane, 1st Anniversary

June 16th at 6.30 p.m.                 Christine & James Robinson

June 17th at 10.30 a.m.                Paddy Corcoran

June 23rd at 6.30 p.m.                 Dr. James Rearden MMM

June 24th at 10.30 a.m.                Emer Mallon

Batterstown Masses

June 5th at 8 p.m.                       Kathleen Smith

Altar Society:                           Team 18:   2nd to 9th June: Ann Fahy Group

 

Recent Death

R.I.P - Benny O’Gorman of Abbeyleix, brother of Sally Prendergast of Balfeighan.

The Study of Theology

The Dominicans are offering a programme of Theology leading up to a degree (BTH) in the Distance Learning format.   People are enabled to study from home with occasional study days and with online support of tutors.   Already hundreds have completed the programme to some level.   Contact The Priory Institute, Tallaght Village, Dublin 24 or call 01 4048124 or 4048127

Pilgrimage to Lourdes

Meath Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. 12 - 15 Sept, led by Bishop Smith.  Fare €699 inclusive. Booking with Pilgrimage Abroad. 01 6359300

Corpus Christi

Feast of Corpus Christi takes place next weekend and coincides with the beginning of the Eucharistic Congress. There will be a short procession after the 11a.m Mass in Kilcloon.  First Communion and Confirmation classes are especially invited to take part. There will also be on display any memorabilia from the last Congress in 1932. If you have any items that are related to the Congress held back then please bring them along and have them marked as to what the reference is.  Thank you.

Blackhall Gaels Lotto

15-17-23-27, no winner, new jackpot is €3,400.   Next draw will take place in Caffrey’s of Batterstown on 2nd June 2012.

Eucharistic Congress

Eucharistic Congress;   Begins on 10th June. People are invited to decorate houses with any flags and colours leading up to the event.

 

The Blessed Trinity

After the birth of Jesus and his rising from the dead, the greatest of the mysteries of our faith was the fulfilling of his promises to serve his apostles with the Holy Spirit at Pentecost.   The word Pentecost means the 50th day after the resurrection.   And so it happened, Jesus had promised a great transformation then and so it was.   The Holy Spirit had come down upon the apostles in the upper room at Jerusalem in the form of tongues of flame which descended on them and rested on the heads of all 120 people present, including several women, Mary, the mother of God, being the most prominent of them.   Suddenly they heard what seemed a powerful wind from heaven, which filled the whole room and they went out to Jerusalem which was thronged by vast numbers of pilgrims there for the Passover and they spoke each in his own language to the vast variety of people who had come to pray at the temple in Jerusalem.   The sceptical among the pilgrims laughed of the talents of Peter and the apostles who spoke to them in their own languages saying that they were drunk and had consumed too much new wine.   For that Peter had his answer.   “These men are not drunk as you imagine: why it’s only the third hour of the day”.   In the days to come said Peter, this is what the prophet spoke of, “In the days to come it is the Lord who speaks, I will pour out my spirit on all mankind”, and so he did.   At that first Pentecost in the upper room where Peter took charge of the apostles, effectively the church began on that first Pentecost in the upper room in Jerusalem.   Peter’s comments were, “The Lord says this to my Lord; sit on my right hand until I make your enemies a footstool for you.  For this reason the whole house of Israel can be certain that God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Christ.   The apostles at this stage must have had a meeting among themselves settling where each of them was to go, leaving and bringing the Good News of salvation to the world.   Hearing the words of Peter those who heard him were cut to the heart and said to Peter, “What must we do brother?”   “You must repent” Peter answered, “And every one of you must be baptised in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit”.   Most of the events that followed the coming of the Holy Spirit were chronicled by St. Luke in a book called, ‘The Acts of the Apostles’.   It mostly chronicled the deeds of St. Peter and St Paul in Rome and on the way to Rome.   They were martyred in Rome about the year 70.   We have very little records of the other Acts of the Apostles.   There was one exception that tells us and it happened by chance.   It chronicles the wanderings of Doubting Thomas to the east, to Southern India where a thriving church still stands of 12 million people which was discovered by the Portuguese going to the east looking for cinnamon.   There were others whose deaths as martyrs are commemorated in our missal, people like St Mark in Alexandria and others who died as martyrs in Babylon.   Some say even in China where a thriving church called the Mysteries of Light founded by monks from the west and encouraged by an emperor of the Tang Dynasty until it was wiped out in the suppression of the Buddhist religion in the 10th century.   All that needs to be said for us about the Blessed Trinity is contained in the collect of today’s Mass.   “God, our Father, who by sending into the world the Word of truth and the spirit of sanctification, made known to the human race your wondrous mystery, grant, we pray that in professing the true faith we may acknowledge the trinity of eternal glory and adore your unity, powerful in majesty, through our Lord Jesus Christ your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever”.   The Blessed Trinity is indeed a mystery far beyond and above us.   Why God the Father sent his only son to our world to show us his concern and creative love we do not know.   His son made us adopted sons of God.   If we are children we are heirs as well: heirs of God and co heirs with Christ, sharing his suffering which we do in this valley of tears so as to share his glory.   Indeed we say with conviction, Glory be to the Father, and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, the God who is, who was and who is to come.   He is our inheritance as he promised us and we must have absolute faith in that inheritance.   As St. Paul puts it in one of his letters, “Eye has not seen nor ear heard nor has it entered into the heart of man what God has prepared for those who love him”.

 

 

 

 

 

Community Text Alert

Public Meeting to launch the Community Text Alert in the Kilcloon & surrounding area will take place on Monday, 18th June at 8 p.m. in Kilcloon N.S.   People wishing to sign up for membership are requested to bring along €10. Enquiries to Mick at 087 2401933.   All welcome.     

Kilcloon Macra

The Blue Jean County Queen festival takes place in Athboy this weekend and all are welcome. Fun for all the family on Sunday afternoon on the Fair Green together with great bands at night.

Kilcloon Batterstown Drama Group

The cast and crew wish to thank most sincerely all who supported their production last weekend. The proceeds are going to the Chernobyl Children's Trust and a fund for a parish defibrillator.

 

 

 
 
 

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